Articles


Jonathon Sullivan MD, PhD, SSC and Mark Rippetoe | March 29, 2017

The term “supercompensation” appears in the biomedical literature in the early twentieth century, not in the context of physiology, but in the context of philosophy and psychoanalytic theory – and that, right away, should raise a red flag. In any event, the term was first appropriated in English by physiologists in 1950, to describe changes in muscle glycogen content during recovery from different workloads. 

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Mark Rippetoe | March 24, 2017

Few things could be simpler: use a few exercises that work as much of the body at one time as possible, find out how strong you are now on these exercises, and next time you train, lift a little heavier weight. Just a little. It’s the same process you used to learn to read, to play the guitar, to get a suntan, and to finish your master’s thesis. 

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Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, SSC | March 22, 2017

The world of training after the novice linear progression may be the most volatile place for a lifter. Three to five months of adding weight to the bar nearly every session on the same lifts is no small task. Yet the process of regularly adding ballast and diligently doing the program does not adequately prepare the lifter for making the very important decision: What’s next?

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Mark Rippetoe | March 17, 2017

The deadlift is a very simple exercise that basically involves picking a barbell up off the ground and setting it back down. It’s a bit more involved than that – most everything is, and despite the fact that some fitness chains have decided to sell memberships by making fun of it, the deadlift is one of the most basic and useful strength exercises in the gym. 

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Adam Lauritzen, SSC | March 15, 2017

Fundamentals are the basics, the things that we learn in the beginning of training and which apply at all levels for an entire career. In a complex world, fundamental things work reliably and consistently. In Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, as with most martial arts and other combative human endeavors, the fundamental concept is to get in a position where your bigger, stronger tools work best and your opponent’s do not.

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