Articles | coaching


Mark Rippetoe | May 19, 2017

Every seminar we hold is attended by people who have read the book, who have been training with the material for various lengths of time, and who are interested enough in what we have to say that they have paid money to hear it from us directly. Yet every Saturday morning’s squat session on the platform involves deprogramming the too-vertical back angle of essentially everybody who attends. Almost everybody. Why?

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Mark Rippetoe | May 17, 2017

There are two groups of people who are responsible for most of the misunderstanding in modern strength and conditioning. They are the people you least expect to be blamed for this serious problem, because they're perfectly innocent of malicious intent even while they remain the source of the misunderstanding. 

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Inna Koppel, SSC | April 12, 2017

It was my responsibility to teach participants – both those who had no cognitive impairment and those with memory problems and dementia – how to strength train in the structured environment of an assisted living facility.  

For as much as they were my students, I was theirs. In my time with the study I learned a few things about training the frail, cognitively impaired elderly, and many things about the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease that went far beyond barbells. 

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Mark Rippetoe | March 10, 2017

Athletes take steroids to get stronger. That’s the only reason they take steroids. Bodybuilders take steroids to build muscle mass and preserve it while they drop bodyfat, but athletes take steroids to get strong. They work by aiding in recovery so that harder training can be done, speeding the healing of injuries, and by making muscles bigger.

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Dan Flanick, SSC and Mark Rippetoe | January 11, 2017

Today, everyone wants to call themselves a coach. This is both good and bad. The good lies in the fact that if there are more coaches, the sheer numbers indicate that more good coaches will work hard at their craft and rise to the top in a field starving for quality coaching. Conversely, it also means there are a greater number of “coaches” who will remain ignorant throughout their careers, and thus grow the number of ignorant trainees and future unprepared coaches who learn from their tutelage. If you’re not a part of the solution, you’re a part of the problem, so in order for us to mitigate the current and future damage done by unqualified coaches, we need to understand what exactly a coach is and does.

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