Articles | coaching

Austin Baraki, MD, SSC and Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, SSC | October 19, 2016

An increasing number of strength coaches are delving into the “therapy” side of practice through additional education in anatomy, human movement, and injury management. Conversely, many young therapists are beginning to recognize the importance of strength training and the principle of progressive overload for long-term adaptation. These “hybrid” coach-therapists have a lot of potential, but many of them introduce unnecessary complexity by inappropriately blending the two approaches for general strength trainees.

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Mark Rippetoe | October 05, 2016

This essay is about the state of the Strength and Conditioning profession in 2014, most of which is practiced in high schools, colleges and universities, and at the professional sports level. Those of you reading this in the distant future, while you drive your flying cars (please be careful), may observe with amusement that all these problems have long since been corrected, if I have even described them accurately here in 2014, and my concerns turned out to be about as relevant to your advanced civilization as global warming. From atop your glacier, you may look down on a landscape devoid of weak, overtrained athletes, and wonder just what in the hell I was so concerned about. I hope so.

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Nicholas Racculia, PhD, SSC | July 06, 2016

The typical Starting Strength Coach (SSC) is an experienced, well-educated coach who is physically strong and active within the fitness industry. Here's how we know this.

The Starting Strength Coaches Association recently conducted a survey of its members. Of the 103 active members as of 3/16/16, 100 responded to this basic survey which polled their experience, education, role within the fitness industry and individual strength levels. The purpose of the survey was to demonstrate the depth and quality of Starting Strength Coaches.

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Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, SSC | June 22, 2016

"The Elbow Problem – when a lifter raises his elbows up too far during a squat – has the potential to produce numerous deleterious effects on the squat, including movement of the barbell on the back, sub-optimal back angle, flexion of the thoracic spine, and elbow/upper limb pain."

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Mark Rippetoe | April 27, 2016

The academic preparation necessary for becoming an effective coach is not being provided by the vast majority of Exercise Physiology programs in this country, and apparently abroad as well...

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