Articles


Mark Rippetoe | March 10, 2017

Athletes take steroids to get stronger. That’s the only reason they take steroids. Bodybuilders take steroids to build muscle mass and preserve it while they drop bodyfat, but athletes take steroids to get strong. They work by aiding in recovery so that harder training can be done, speeding the healing of injuries, and by making muscles bigger.

Continue reading


Andy Baker, SSC | March 08, 2017

Despite its popularity and widespread use there exists some persistent confusion as how to best navigate through all the possible twists and turns of the Texas Method. The Texas Method is the enigma of intermediate programming. No other particular program has been as single-handedly responsible for some astonishing examples of extended intermediate progress while simultaneously burying so many others in just a few weeks’ time. Texas Method is pretty much Pass/Fail, and unfortunately there are too many examples of Fail from its users. 

Continue reading


Mark Rippetoe | March 03, 2017

If you are a competitive distance runner or cyclist who is serious about your sport, this article has not been written for you. This highly informative discussion is intended for those people who have taken seriously the advice of doctors, Physical Therapists, exercise physiologists, and the popular media's dutiful reporting on these sources of common misinformation about what kind of physical activity is best for your long-term health and continued ability to participate in the business of living well. 

Continue reading


Mark Rippetoe | February 24, 2017

The media has been interested in strength training recently, although they don't know that's what they're actually interested in.

A study published in the British Medical Journal Open – Leisure time computer use and adolescent bone health —findings from the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures: a cross-sectional study – morphed into this headline from Reuters: “Screen Time Linked to Weaker Bones in Teen Boys.”

Continue reading


Mark Rippetoe | February 17, 2017

I was born in 1956. That makes me “old.” Granted, I'm pretty beat up these days. I've had my share of injuries, the result of having lived a rather careless active life outdoors, on horses, motorcycles, bicycles, and the field of competition. People my age who have not spent their years in a chair have an accumulation of aches and pains, most of them earned the hard way. And for us, beat up or not, the best way to stay in the game is to train for strength.

Continue reading




Starting Strength Weekly Report

Highlights from the StartingStrength Community. Browse archives.