Articles | programming


Mark Rippetoe | January 20, 2017

As we get older, many of us go to the doctor more than we should. We ask the doctor about things doctors don’t really know much about, like diet and exercise. Doctors – having had no institutional training in either diet or exercise while at the same time feeling as though they must maintain their authority over all things physical – most usually just go ahead and provide advice about these things anyway. 

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Mark Rippetoe | December 23, 2016

Training with weights produces muscle soreness. Many people don't like to be sore, and that's why they won't train for strength. Running also makes you sore, but not as bad and not all over the body, like weights, so running is more popular. Other people have noticed that riding a bike doesn't produce sore muscles, so they ride a bike for exercise instead of lifting weights or running. But to some people – and this may come as a surprise to most of you – getting sore becomes the whole point of exercise. They wear their soreness like a badge of honor, and regard sore muscles as the price they must pay for continued self-improvement.

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Mark Rippetoe | December 16, 2016

Time is money. Money is scarce these days, everywhere but DC. You want to be stronger, so you go to the gym. The best use of your time there is the simple progressive barbell training program we have discussed before, one that drives an upward strength adaptation with a programmed increase in load over a full range of motion using as much of your muscle mass as possible. This approach allows you to lift a gradually increasing amount of weight, thus making you stronger. Stronger means only one thing: you can apply more force with your muscles. The process of getting stronger improves the capacity of every aspect of your physical existence. So, getting stronger in the gym is the best reason to go there.

But it is incredibly easy to waste precious time once you're inside. Here are the top three:

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Mark Rippetoe | October 05, 2016

This essay is about the state of the Strength and Conditioning profession in 2014, most of which is practiced in high schools, colleges and universities, and at the professional sports level. Those of you reading this in the distant future, while you drive your flying cars (please be careful), may observe with amusement that all these problems have long since been corrected, if I have even described them accurately here in 2014, and my concerns turned out to be about as relevant to your advanced civilization as global warming. From atop your glacier, you may look down on a landscape devoid of weak, overtrained athletes, and wonder just what in the hell I was so concerned about. I hope so.

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Mark Rippetoe | June 08, 2016

If you operate a gym, or if you are a uterus-bearing individual who trains and plans on having kids, this topic will be of interest. Pregnancy and training are discussed in the Q&A at almost every Starting Strength Seminar, and the questions that are asked are very important, both from the standpoint of the mother and the gym owner.

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