Articles | science & medicine


Mark Rippetoe | May 19, 2017

Every seminar we hold is attended by people who have read the book, who have been training with the material for various lengths of time, and who are interested enough in what we have to say that they have paid money to hear it from us directly. Yet every Saturday morning’s squat session on the platform involves deprogramming the too-vertical back angle of essentially everybody who attends. Almost everybody. Why?

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Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, SSC, Robert Hoffman, MD, and Kristopher Hunt, MD | April 05, 2017

Both creatine monohydrate and creatine ethyl ester have the ability to substantially increase serum creatinine levels during initial stages of supplementation, which may potentially alter or inappropriately influence diagnosis and management of a patient presenting to the emergency department with and isolated elevated serum creatinine.

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Mark Rippetoe | February 24, 2017

The media has been interested in strength training recently, although they don't know that's what they're actually interested in.

A study published in the British Medical Journal Open – Leisure time computer use and adolescent bone health —findings from the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures: a cross-sectional study – morphed into this headline from Reuters: “Screen Time Linked to Weaker Bones in Teen Boys.”

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Mark Rippetoe | February 15, 2017

A surprisingly large percentage of the population has a Leg Length Discrepancy (LLD) – I’ve seen estimates, probably conservative, that 70% of the population exhibit LLD. It’s normally not noticeable when the difference is less than 1/2 inch or so. But when it’s greater than that, the asymmetric loading on the pelvis under a squat or deadlift can be enough to cause problems that should be addressed with corrective measures. We use a shim under the foot.

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Austin Baraki, MD, SSC | February 01, 2017

I hear about people’s aches and pains all the time, whether in the hospital, the gym, or even in social situations. Sometimes pain represents a serious, potentially life-threatening problem, while other times it’s a more mild, nagging ache for no apparent reason. Either situation can be frustrating and debilitating.

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