Articles | science & medicine


Mark Rippetoe | June 21, 2017

“Genetics” is a term bandied about fairly loosely in sports. A good definition of genetic potential is whether the athlete possesses the active genotype necessary to excel in sport. In simpler terms, does the athlete have a suitable set of genes, and enough of them turned on, to be good in the sport of choice? And how does the development of the organism within the environment affect the expression of the genotype?

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Mark Rippetoe | June 02, 2017

The idea that below-parallel squats are bad for the knees is complete nonsense which, for some reason that escapes me, will not go away. This mythology is mindlessly repeated by orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists, registered nurses, personal trainers, dieticians, sportscasters, librarians, lunch-room monitors, and many other people in positions of authority with no actual knowledge of the topic, and therefore no basis in fact for their opinion.

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Mark Rippetoe | May 24, 2017

Strength training has long been the victim of a lack of focus on the movement patterns of the segments of body itself, in lieu of the great deal of attention being paid to the constituent components – the “muscle groups” of bodybuilding-think. Let’s examine your favorite and mine, the deadlift, from the perspective of rigid-body analysis, and see if we can’t come to a better understanding of what actually happens when a bar is pulled from the floor.

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Mark Rippetoe | May 19, 2017

Every seminar we hold is attended by people who have read the book, who have been training with the material for various lengths of time, and who are interested enough in what we have to say that they have paid money to hear it from us directly. Yet every Saturday morning’s squat session on the platform involves deprogramming the too-vertical back angle of essentially everybody who attends. Almost everybody. Why?

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Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, SSC, Robert Hoffman, MD, and Kristopher Hunt, MD | April 05, 2017

Both creatine monohydrate and creatine ethyl ester have the ability to substantially increase serum creatinine levels during initial stages of supplementation, which may potentially alter or inappropriately influence diagnosis and management of a patient presenting to the emergency department with and isolated elevated serum creatinine.

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