Articles | science & medicine


Mark Rippetoe | February 15, 2017

A surprisingly large percentage of the population has a Leg Length Discrepancy (LLD) – I’ve seen estimates, probably conservative, that 70% of the population exhibit LLD. It’s normally not noticeable when the difference is less than 1/2 inch or so. But when it’s greater than that, the asymmetric loading on the pelvis under a squat or deadlift can be enough to cause problems that should be addressed with corrective measures. We use a shim under the foot.

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Austin Baraki, MD, SSC | February 01, 2017

I hear about people’s aches and pains all the time, whether in the hospital, the gym, or even in social situations. Sometimes pain represents a serious, potentially life-threatening problem, while other times it’s a more mild, nagging ache for no apparent reason. Either situation can be frustrating and debilitating.

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Austin Baraki, MD, SSC | January 04, 2017

Testosterone is a steroid hormone that exerts a wide number of important androgenic and anabolic effects in the human body. It is a fundamental component of male physiology, although smaller amounts are produced in females as well. Adequate levels are crucial for optimal health, and there have been growing concerns about hypogonadism (commonly known as “Low T”) being a highly prevalent and under-diagnosed condition with the potential to dramatically reduce quality of life among males.

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Mark Rippetoe | December 23, 2016

Training with weights produces muscle soreness. Many people don't like to be sore, and that's why they won't train for strength. Running also makes you sore, but not as bad and not all over the body, like weights, so running is more popular. Other people have noticed that riding a bike doesn't produce sore muscles, so they ride a bike for exercise instead of lifting weights or running. But to some people – and this may come as a surprise to most of you – getting sore becomes the whole point of exercise. They wear their soreness like a badge of honor, and regard sore muscles as the price they must pay for continued self-improvement.

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Austin Baraki, MD, SSC and Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, SSC | October 19, 2016

An increasing number of strength coaches are delving into the “therapy” side of practice through additional education in anatomy, human movement, and injury management. Conversely, many young therapists are beginning to recognize the importance of strength training and the principle of progressive overload for long-term adaptation. These “hybrid” coach-therapists have a lot of potential, but many of them introduce unnecessary complexity by inappropriately blending the two approaches for general strength trainees.

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