Articles | science & medicine


Austin Baraki, MD, SSC | January 04, 2017

Testosterone is a steroid hormone that exerts a wide number of important androgenic and anabolic effects in the human body. It is a fundamental component of male physiology, although smaller amounts are produced in females as well. Adequate levels are crucial for optimal health, and there have been growing concerns about hypogonadism (commonly known as “Low T”) being a highly prevalent and under-diagnosed condition with the potential to dramatically reduce quality of life among males.

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Mark Rippetoe | December 23, 2016

Training with weights produces muscle soreness. Many people don't like to be sore, and that's why they won't train for strength. Running also makes you sore, but not as bad and not all over the body, like weights, so running is more popular. Other people have noticed that riding a bike doesn't produce sore muscles, so they ride a bike for exercise instead of lifting weights or running. But to some people – and this may come as a surprise to most of you – getting sore becomes the whole point of exercise. They wear their soreness like a badge of honor, and regard sore muscles as the price they must pay for continued self-improvement.

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Austin Baraki, MD, SSC and Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, SSC | October 19, 2016

An increasing number of strength coaches are delving into the “therapy” side of practice through additional education in anatomy, human movement, and injury management. Conversely, many young therapists are beginning to recognize the importance of strength training and the principle of progressive overload for long-term adaptation. These “hybrid” coach-therapists have a lot of potential, but many of them introduce unnecessary complexity by inappropriately blending the two approaches for general strength trainees.

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Mark Rippetoe | October 14, 2016

One of the most persistent myths in the entire panoply of conventional exercise wisdom is that squats below parallel are somehow bad for the knees. This old saw is mindlessly repeated by poorly-informed orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists, and chiropractors all over the world. Better-informed professionals such as productive strength coaches, weightlifters and powerlifters, and those willing to examine the anatomy of the knees and hips for more than just a minute or two know better. Here are four reasons why.

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Jordan Feigenbaum, MD, SSC | August 03, 2016

The grip in the deadlift is an often overlooked yet crucial piece of the puzzle when it comes to performance and the subsequent gainzZz from the lift. In the 2nd installment of The Problem series, we’ll discuss the intricacies of gripping the bar in the deadlift, and what to do about it.

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