Articles | strength & health


Adam Lauritzen, SSC | March 15, 2017

Fundamentals are the basics, the things that we learn in the beginning of training and which apply at all levels for an entire career. In a complex world, fundamental things work reliably and consistently. In Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, as with most martial arts and other combative human endeavors, the fundamental concept is to get in a position where your bigger, stronger tools work best and your opponent’s do not.

Continue reading


Mark Rippetoe | March 03, 2017

If you are a competitive distance runner or cyclist who is serious about your sport, this article has not been written for you. This highly informative discussion is intended for those people who have taken seriously the advice of doctors, Physical Therapists, exercise physiologists, and the popular media's dutiful reporting on these sources of common misinformation about what kind of physical activity is best for your long-term health and continued ability to participate in the business of living well. 

Continue reading


Mark Rippetoe | February 24, 2017

The media has been interested in strength training recently, although they don't know that's what they're actually interested in.

A study published in the British Medical Journal Open – Leisure time computer use and adolescent bone health —findings from the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures: a cross-sectional study – morphed into this headline from Reuters: “Screen Time Linked to Weaker Bones in Teen Boys.”

Continue reading


Mark Rippetoe | February 17, 2017

I was born in 1956. That makes me “old.” Granted, I'm pretty beat up these days. I've had my share of injuries, the result of having lived a rather careless active life outdoors, on horses, motorcycles, bicycles, and the field of competition. People my age who have not spent their years in a chair have an accumulation of aches and pains, most of them earned the hard way. And for us, beat up or not, the best way to stay in the game is to train for strength.

Continue reading


Mark Rippetoe | February 15, 2017

A surprisingly large percentage of the population has a Leg Length Discrepancy (LLD) – I’ve seen estimates, probably conservative, that 70% of the population exhibit LLD. It’s normally not noticeable when the difference is less than 1/2 inch or so. But when it’s greater than that, the asymmetric loading on the pelvis under a squat or deadlift can be enough to cause problems that should be addressed with corrective measures. We use a shim under the foot.

Continue reading




Starting Strength Weekly Report

Highlights from the StartingStrength Community. Browse archives.