Articles | strength & health


CJ Gotcher, SSC and Austin Baraki, MD, SSC | December 07, 2016

We frequently hear and answer people’s concerns about resistance training and cardiovascular health in general, including claims that barbell training “doesn’t do anything for the heart” and that “you’ll give yourself a heart attack if you don’t do some running, too.” Since the heart is just a wee bit important to our health, and since no one is looking forward to their next heart attack, it’s important to address these concerns. 

Continue reading


Matthew Swogger | November 30, 2016

On 11 June 2004, around midnight, I fell 40 feet off a building and broke my back. Since that time, I have been through an interesting rehabilitation. The story is lengthy, but barbell training figured into my recovery. Strength training is the basis upon which I continue to keep myself functioning on a day-to-day basis, and my experiences may be of use to you the next time you get hurt, or just cannot seem to find the motivation to go and do your squats.

Continue reading


Rebekah Cygan, PTA, SSC | November 16, 2016

Stronger seems like a good idea to people; it just doesn’t sound like the most important thing to most people. Their ears like the sound of “functional fitness” better. And I find myself thinking, “If I could get you under a barbell, I could change your life.” 

Continue reading


| October 21, 2016

Strength training is quite popular these days, and is getting more popular as people realize the benefits of approaching their exercise program with a definite goal in mind. Stronger is more useful. Stronger is better. Stronger even looks better. And stronger is a straightforward process – lift a little more weight today than you did last time, and keep doing so for as long as possible.

But as simple as this process is, it can become unnecessarily complicated without a basic understanding of the nature of the exercises that make you strong most efficiently. 

Continue reading


Mark Rippetoe | October 14, 2016

One of the most persistent myths in the entire panoply of conventional exercise wisdom is that squats below parallel are somehow bad for the knees. This old saw is mindlessly repeated by poorly-informed orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists, and chiropractors all over the world. Better-informed professionals such as productive strength coaches, weightlifters and powerlifters, and those willing to examine the anatomy of the knees and hips for more than just a minute or two know better. Here are four reasons why.

Continue reading




Starting Strength Weekly Report

Highlights from the StartingStrength Community. Browse archives.

Under the Bar Contest

Enter to win shirts & mugs.