Articles | strength & health


Mark Rippetoe | June 21, 2017

“Genetics” is a term bandied about fairly loosely in sports. A good definition of genetic potential is whether the athlete possesses the active genotype necessary to excel in sport. In simpler terms, does the athlete have a suitable set of genes, and enough of them turned on, to be good in the sport of choice? And how does the development of the organism within the environment affect the expression of the genotype?

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Leah Lutz, SSC | June 07, 2017

“Leah, 5 years ago, would you have ever imagined doing what you are now?”

Never. And this question isn’t about my weight loss, it’s about my strength training. Losing over 100 lbs was something I had doubted I could do, but I was determined to make it finally happen. And I did. Strength training and eventually competing was never, ever part of that plan to “get healthy,” but back then I clearly had little to no substantive understanding of what being “healthy” would mean. I just thought it meant to lose weight, get to a smaller size, and finally be “not overweight.” 

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Mark Rippetoe | June 02, 2017

The idea that below-parallel squats are bad for the knees is complete nonsense which, for some reason that escapes me, will not go away. This mythology is mindlessly repeated by orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists, registered nurses, personal trainers, dieticians, sportscasters, librarians, lunch-room monitors, and many other people in positions of authority with no actual knowledge of the topic, and therefore no basis in fact for their opinion.

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Mark Rippetoe | May 31, 2017

In late 2014 I wrote an essay about “Functional Training” for T-Nation, the unedited version of which appears on our website. The basis of the argument is an analysis of the nature of training, the process by which a specific quantifiable physiological adaptation – strength, endurance, aerobic capacity, etc. – is accumulated over time, and the need for practice, by which the physical skills – the ability to execute the movement patterns dependent on accuracy and precision necessary for effective performance – are developed. Performance day depends on both training and practice. I revisit the topic here.

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Mark Rippetoe | May 26, 2017

The route from Beowulf to Pajama Boy has been a very long downhill slide. Popular culture has always shaped our standards and expectations, then as well as now. “Pajama Boy” – a term applied to the famous photo of an employee of Organizing For Action, a political advocacy group which supported Obamacare, is the current archetype of a new style of male – the government-approved, popular-culture-validated male.

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