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Thread: Strength Training for People My Age

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Farmington Hills, MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giri View Post
    Most people won't even consider doing something simple, basic, scientific, that requires hard work and discipline. Over the two years I spent at the gym at work, I got two interested in starting strength. That's 2 out of 30 odd people that show up at gym regularly. I share SS articles in my family group regularly and it was only my 56 year old uncle and my brother that opted to get started on Starting Strength.

    But selling SS to women is what I find to be near impossible.
    Selling it, perhaps.

    But despair not: my coaching practice is living proof that many women will sell themselves on it.

  2. #12

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    Thank you for the advice. I definitely need more time between sets. Born in 1947 and by far the oldest person in the gym doing bar work, including cleans and jerks. I do not want to compete, except with myself, but must say that seeing the young guys with good form doing 50% to 100% more weight than I am doing gives me incentive.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Phoenix, Arizona
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    1,113

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    I am 61. I tried to get a friend of mine, who is 72, to be interested in strength training he asked me to show him. I had him do 3 sets of 5 squats with the empty bar and 3 sets of 5 presses with the empty bar. He did both without any apparent difficulty. The next day he emailed me and said that he was sore and he decided he better just stick to walking on the treadmill that was the last I ever heard of strength training from him.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Farmington Hills, MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Culican View Post
    I am 61. I tried to get a friend of mine, who is 72, to be interested in strength training he asked me to show him. I had him do 3 sets of 5 squats with the empty bar and 3 sets of 5 presses with the empty bar. He did both without any apparent difficulty. The next day he emailed me and said that he was sore and he decided he better just stick to walking on the treadmill that was the last I ever heard of strength training from him.
    Horse to water. You did your part as a good friend.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Culican View Post
    I am 61. I tried to get a friend of mine, who is 72, to be interested in strength training he asked me to show him. I had him do 3 sets of 5 squats with the empty bar and 3 sets of 5 presses with the empty bar. He did both without any apparent difficulty. The next day he emailed me and said that he was sore and he decided he better just stick to walking on the treadmill that was the last I ever heard of strength training from him.
    I did this with a 48 year old friend a couple years ago. Hurt for days. Decided to stick to running. And he came to me because he noticed "i'd always been strong". Ah well.

  6. #16

    Default Adding 10 minutes of HIIT at the end

    Quote Originally Posted by tef View Post
    I'm 58, 65", about 180 pounds. I've been doing strength strength training for about 2.5 years. I'm stronger now then I've ever been my entire life (355 squat, 227 BP, 160 Press, and 410 DL in pounds). But until I added stationary biking back into my training I lacked energy, lacked general stability and generally felt achy. For me, only doing strength training was great for strength but something was wrong. Now I feel better and my strength is improving after being stuck for some time. For me I needed something more than just strength training.
    I have read the articles here which recommend that endurance type exercise not be incorporated into the program which is focused on strength building. The energy expended hurts recovery time. However, for someone older who is not exactly interested in competing but just wants to become stronger, a finishing session which includes a short High Intensity session might lead to gains in overall health. I have been trying Starting Strength and it has helped a lot. I'm just a slacker who cannot keep on the proper schedule. I've been using five minutes on the rowing machine for the session warm-up. Adding 10 minutes more at the end is something I'm working on from a time schedule point. Perhaps some of the experts can opine on the pluses or minuses of the addition at the end.

    Several recent study reports have been published showing a whole lot of benefit from a few minutes of HIIT. Pretty amazing increase in mitochondria and ribosome capability. Much greater benefit in older people but very good for both. Total time is only ten minutes and those include only three 20 second bursts of max effort ( one minute of that total).

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/1...inute-workout/

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0307155214.htm

    "They found that while strength training was effective at building muscle mass, high-intensity interval training yielded the biggest benefits at the cellular level. The younger volunteers in the interval training group saw a 49% increase in mitochondrial capacity, and the older volunteers saw an even more dramatic 69% increase. Interval training also improved volunteers' insulin sensitivity, which indicates a lower likelihood of developing diabetes. However, interval training was less effective at improving muscle strength, which typically declines with aging. "If people have to pick one exercise, I would recommend high-intensity interval training, but I think it would be more beneficial if they could do 3-4 days of interval training and then a couple days of strength training," says Nair. But, of course, any exercise was better than no exercise.
    Nair stressed that the focus of this study wasn't on developing recommendations, but rather on understanding how exercise helps at the molecular level. As we age, the energy-generating capacity of our cells' mitochondria slowly decreases. By comparing proteomic and RNA-sequencing data from people on different exercise programs, the researchers found evidence that exercise encourages the cell to make more RNA copies of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins and proteins responsible for muscle growth. Exercise also appeared to boost the ribosomes' ability to build mitochondrial proteins. The most impressive finding was the increase in muscle protein content. In some cases, the high-intensity biking regimen actually seemed to reverse the age-related decline in mitochondrial function and proteins needed for muscle building.
    The high-intensity biking regimen also rejuvenated the volunteers' ribosomes, which are responsible for producing our cells' protein building blocks. The researchers also found a robust increase in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Increase in protein content explains enhanced mitochondrial function and muscle hypertrophy. Exercise's ability to transform these key organelles could explain why exercise benefits our health in so many different ways."



    Also see:
    Ten minutes of interval training three times a week will make you fitter, healthier and slimmer

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Giri View Post
    Most people won't even consider doing something simple, basic, scientific, that requires hard work and discipline. Over the two years I spent at the gym at work, I got two interested in starting strength. That's 2 out of 30 odd people that show up at gym regularly. I share SS articles in my family group regularly and it was only my 56 year old uncle and my brother that opted to get started on Starting Strength.

    But selling SS to women is what I find to be near impossible.
    Giri, that number is lower still. Of the two you got interested in SS, one had already decided to do it and only needed help with the particulars.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by karthik View Post
    Giri, that number is lower still. Of the two you got interested in SS, one had already decided to do it and only needed help with the particulars.
    While the number reduces to 1.5, good to know you are still around

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