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Thread: Range of movement

  1. #1
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    Default Range of movement

    Mark:

    I have a question regarding your recommendation as to the range of motion to be performed in the basic lifts. While generally it is outlined in the book and in various starting strenth videos that one should aim for maximum involvement of muscle mass over the full range of motion, with respect to the deadlift you advise to choose a relatively narrow stance and (consequently) grip in order to reduce the range of movement. Obviously this leads to heavier loads that can be handled, but this would also be the case in the other movements, as e.g. partial squats can be performed with much higher weights than below parallel squats, but are strongly rejected. What is the reason for the different view on the deadlift-ROM?

    Many thanks in advance

    Stefan

  2. #2
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    The four criteria for exercise efficiency are:

    1. The greatest amount of muscle mass that can be involved in the movement

    2. Over the longest effective ROM

    3. So that the heaviest weight can be lifted

    4. So you get stronger.

    The criteria are additive, i.e. #2 must still satisfy #1, and #3 must still satisfy #2.

    Understand?

    Starting Strength Seminars

  3. #3
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    So, I understand that an extended ROM in the deadlift would not be effective, therefore it makes sense to go for more weight over a shorter ROM. In contrast, squats should be done full ROM ( not necessarily ATG but below parallel) although this leads to lower loads as compared to higher squatting techniques. Thus, effectiveness is apparantly not determined by the amount of weight that can be handled. What determines the effective ROM of a lift?

  4. #4

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    Would it be fair to also say that these criteria and their additive application define the difference between strength training and strength sports? I.e. a powerlifter would shorten 2. the effective ROM in order to achieve 3. a higher weight or a weightlifter might forego 1. in order to catch the bar at the shortest point along the bar path to achieve 3. Not sure if I would call bodybuilding a strength sport but they often manage to ignore 1., 2., 3., and 4. in order to achieve jackedness.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocStefan View Post
    So, I understand that an extended ROM in the deadlift would not be effective, therefore it makes sense to go for more weight over a shorter ROM. In contrast, squats should be done full ROM ( not necessarily ATG but below parallel) although this leads to lower loads as compared to higher squatting techniques. Thus, effectiveness is apparantly not determined by the amount of weight that can be handled. What determines the effective ROM of a lift?
    #1 determines the ROM. You'll enjoy the seminar, and the book.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pekingman View Post
    Would it be fair to also say that these criteria and their additive application define the difference between strength training and strength sports? I.e. a powerlifter would shorten 2. the effective ROM in order to achieve 3. a higher weight or a weightlifter might forego 1. in order to catch the bar at the shortest point along the bar path to achieve 3. Not sure if I would call bodybuilding a strength sport but they often manage to ignore 1., 2., 3., and 4. in order to achieve jackedness.
    Yes, it would. Precisely.

    Starting Strength Seminars

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