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Thread: Getting Played: Whose Fault Is It? Maybe yours.

  1. #1
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    Default Getting Played: Whose Fault Is It? Maybe yours.


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  2. #2
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    It's good to see that Chase's barbell training has allowed him to achieve his ultimate goal of doing a weird Turkish Get-up from a split position with a medicine ball.

  3. #3
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    He has a talented coach.

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  4. #4
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    I got played for 60 years before chance brought me here.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    When you've mentioned narrowcasting in the past, I thought that meant the SS target market was people who have experienced the novice effect and subsequent failure/stall of silly BS and finally realized that the next fad would have the same results. Is that a different group than those "intelligent enough to get past the propaganda" or maybe just the less bright end of it, who have to do their own trial and error?

  6. #6
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    By "narrowcasting" I mean that we are appealing to a brighter-than-average segment of the market, because most people do not understand that, for example, it doesn't matter what the best players in the NFL do in the weight room, and why.

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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bestafter60 View Post
    I got played for 60 years before chance brought me here.
    I was played for 50 years until an Amazon book review (of all things) of Starting Strength got me here. I'm late to the party but will do everything in my power to spread the word. Most people don't want to listen unfortunately. Including my old lady who swears by P90x

  8. #8

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    Was the picture taken at WFAC? I can't imagine many other gyms have a piano and cello leaned against the wall.

  9. #9
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    It a bass. A largemouth bass.

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  10. #10

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    Most people are informed by their reading of the broader internet, by magazines, and by the mainstream media, all of whom have a superficial childlike understanding of quite literally everything they cover. If the topic is simple – a guy is dead – they can handle it with at least some level of accuracy. If the topic is complex – the guy is dead, but 3 other people are dead too, there may be others, and it's too early to tell why – they make it simple whether it is or not, because they cannot function at a level any higher than the simple. And when their 30-second piece is done, they're on to the next cursory examination of that which they know and care nothing about, never looking back. This is because of who they are and the constraints of their format. In every case, subtle detail escapes the formula.

    When it comes to fitness, physical performance, and athletics, the media is no different.

    When I was reading this, I was reminded of Michael Crichton's quote, which I find very useful.


    Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect works as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward––reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.
    In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story-and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read with renewed interest as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about far-off Palestine than it was about the story you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.
    That is the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect. I’d point out it does not operate in other arenas of life. In ordinary life, if somebody consistently exaggerates or lies to you, you soon discount everything they say. In court, there is the legal doctrine of falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus, which means untruthful in one part, untruthful in all.
    But when it comes to the media, we believe against evidence that it is probably worth our time to read other parts of the paper. When, in fact, it almost certainly isn’t. The only possible explanation for our behavior is amnesia.


    Michael Crichton

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