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Thread: Score one for the Barbell!

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluripotent View Post
    I suppose it's a fair question. But if you look more closely, you'll find this type of stuff in all fields. We've talked about some of them concerning medicine. Hypertension is a good example. It's extremely common, easy to understand, simple to treat, yet virtually everyone is doing a really terrible job when everyone should really be nailing this one. Cholesterol is not as great of an example. It's similar, but the information is new enough that it's more understandable that people fuck it up so badly. Still shouldn't happen, but when you have major guidelines saying the things that are exactly what you shouldn't do (ATP4), it gets complicated.

    Also, not all patients are going to go for strength training. I personally think they should know what they should be doing to get better, and then if they decide not to, OK. It's on them. Most patients won't even go to regular rehab unless it's covered by insurance. If they have to pay for it, forget it. Doesn't matter if they will lose function. It's not an argument you're going to win.

    Why do people still smoke? You can't get them to stop no matter what you tell them and no matter what happens to them. I see people all the time who have finally stopped smoking...after they have no lung tissue left, have metastatic cancer or a major stroke or heart attack. Then they start again a little while later. Who cares at that point? I'm like, "why quit now?!" Knock yourself out. I just discharged a youngish guy who told me he finally quit smoking. You put a stethoscope on his back and you hear nothing. Virtually no air movement at all and he's tripoding and guppy breathing. He has maybe 5% lung tissue remaining. He's on 6L O2 and PRN trilogy unit at home. All he can do without getting winded is watch TV. Why bother stopping now?

    Also: Smart people learn from their mistakes. Really smart people learn from the mistakes of others.

    If you can't set an example, at least your life can serve as a warning to others.
    I had a simpler answer: it's hard to do, and harder to get other people to do.

    Strength coaches get people who want to do it. Doctors get people who are sick or infirmed in some way.

    People who want to and --are willing to-- do difficult things to get better and improve themselves tend to do that. Strength coaches get people who are willing. Doctors get people who need to be. The difference is important.

  2. #32

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    The answer was in the question - "field of medicine"
    My mother in law is a doctor (GP). One of my best friends is a doctor (surgeon/GP). I work with doctors everyday (ER) - their field is medicine. That is, you have a problem, here is the medicine for it, now get out. Theirs is primarily a pharmacological approach, that's all they have time for. They have 10 minutes to assess, diagnose, advise and prescribe a medication or two - then it on to the next victim. It is far easier to say "take these, and don't squat full range of motion" than it is to study sports science and gain years of experience coaching or training in the strength field in order to actually solve the problem as opposed to addressing the symptom (in all of their spare time). It covers their ass as well. They also know that people don't generally want to take control of their situation, they just want a quick fix to the symptom. Besides that, the average doctor's knowledge of good nutrition is wanting let alone their knowledge of strength training or exercise in general. Also, my friend, the surgeon, only squats half squats because his knees hurt! Yeah, Duh! Very smart dude with a lot of education but none of it translates into the field of strength training. Be careful with the word "expert." Most of the doctors I work with would not claim any such distinction.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Egener View Post
    The answer was in the question - "field of medicine"
    My mother in law is a doctor (GP). One of my best friends is a doctor (surgeon/GP). I work with doctors everyday (ER) - their field is medicine. That is, you have a problem, here is the medicine for it, now get out. Theirs is primarily a pharmacological approach, that's all they have time for. They have 10 minutes to assess, diagnose, advise and prescribe a medication or two - then it on to the next victim. It is far easier to say "take these, and don't squat full range of motion" than it is to study sports science and gain years of experience coaching or training in the strength field in order to actually solve the problem as opposed to addressing the symptom (in all of their spare time). It covers their ass as well. They also know that people don't generally want to take control of their situation, they just want a quick fix to the symptom. Besides that, the average doctor's knowledge of good nutrition is wanting let alone their knowledge of strength training or exercise in general. Also, my friend, the surgeon, only squats half squats because his knees hurt! Yeah, Duh! Very smart dude with a lot of education but none of it translates into the field of strength training. Be careful with the word "expert." Most of the doctors I work with would not claim any such distinction.
    Well, OK. This seems like a heafty dose of doctor bashing, which I honestly have no objection to if they deserve it. But is it the doctors who want to prescribe medicines or is it the patient who demands them? Probably some of both, but from my experience, there are a lot of things I would "prescribe" that are not medications if only the patients would do it. Medications are a last resort when nothing else will work (and surgery is what happens when medicine fails). Often, other things besides medications would work, but you can't get people to do it, so they get meds when a more reasonable person would not. There are very few of these more reasonable people frequenting doctors offices.

    I actually just got fired by a young woman who didn't like it when I told her that further cardiac testing would be of little benefit, and I wouldn't recommend it. She had already had an extensive negative workup and zero risk factors. But she wants to be sick. Someone is eventually going to indulge her, because it's much easier than being yelled at and having her write nasty letters to your CMO about how horrible you are because you "didn't take her pain seriously."

  4. #34

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    Ha ha. I suppose I did come across a little that way.

    You hit the nail on the head. It is difficult to maintain a position of differentiation when you are stuck between a rock and a hard place. People go in expecting to come out with something, and it's not good advice. After all what are they paying you for? Accountability and hard work are never popular. Complex. I am distanced enough that I can shamefully simplify.

    A good doctor has my utmost respect.

    Regards,
    Pete

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Longview Texas
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    Update from Natalie,

    My back is feeling great, thanks for asking. In fact, I've had NO pain at all for the past eight days. On Tuesday I did all of my deadlifts from the floor, and they felt really solid. I'm so glad I followed your advice instead of staying on the couch and resting as the doctor recommended!!

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