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Thread: Anterior pelvic tilt?

  1. #1

    Default Anterior pelvic tilt?

    I herniated l5/s1 almost a year ago. Have tried pretty much every conservative treatment and have even tried going back to lifting.

    Prior to that, i had about 2 years weight training with starting strength concepts. I have always noticed that I have an anterior pelvic tilt that is quite large. I am thinking that it has a big part in this problem, If i really flex my glutes and abs, it is hard but i can get my pelvis lined correctly for a short while and it seems that it takes pressure off the affected nerve, temporarily relieving pain.

    I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions on how to fix this issue. I think that the tilt is causing issues in every day life that keeps aggravating the problem.

  2. #2
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    Has heavy ab work (weighted situps from 90-degree hips) not helped this? Sounds like you need to hire a good, experienced chiropractor. They are available, so ask around.


  3. #3

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    Ive always done heavy ab work back when i was lifting, weighted in the ranges of 5-8 reps.

    I am kind of lost with this injury. Its been about a year now that IVe been out. I am dieing to get back into the gym, put some mass on again, and get strong again.

    Initially, I herniated the disk either moving a couch up some stairs or doing a warmup squat (that I wasn't perfectly tight for and going fast)(2 injuries close together)

    Ive been through rest, nsaids, PT, chiropractor, spinal decompression, cortisone oral and injected, and i still am having back problems.

    I have tried lifting and trying to strengthen stuff without compressing the back, sled pulling etc. I am still haing issues. I have both starting strength 1 and 2 which i have studied in great detail numerous times. I have always been a form nazi but it just isn't working.

    I have been seeing a spinal orthopod that will do a laproscopic microdiscectomy. I am thinking about actually considering the surgery. He said I would be back in comission a week later and i could lift probably unrestricticted about 3 months later.

  4. #4
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    If you have an MRI that says this is what's causing the pain and that this surgery will fix the back, let him do it, you fool. Life is short.


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    (weighted situps from 90-degree hips)
    I don't understand this. What does this look like?

  6. #6
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    They are done on a bench that lays you on your back with femurs vertical and shins under a pair of rollers. Or you can bend your knees until your femurs are steep and catch your toes under a stop of some sort. The weight goes on your chest (easier) or behind your neck (harder).


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    They are done on a bench that lays you on your back with femurs vertical and shins under a pair of rollers. Or you can bend your knees until your femurs are steep and catch your toes under a stop of some sort. The weight goes on your chest (easier) or behind your neck (harder).
    Understood, thank you.

  8. #8
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    When I did mine (l4/l5 and l5/s1) I had great success with both the sit-ups as Rip prescribed and also hanging leg-lifts (weighted), in either a Captain's chair or using ab slings. They were nice because it was like getting on an inversion table (which was one of the things that my Chiro was having me do).

    As an interesting aside, and Rip will probably marvel at this, I had a really good Ortho. He recommended the chiro, and wouldn't consider surgery until I had tried it for several months. Apparently, the success rate of major back surgeries is not all the good, and he wanted me to try less invasive things first. That's primarily how I got turned on to the McKenzie method as well as Starting Strength.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    If you have an MRI that says this is what's causing the pain and that this surgery will fix the back, let him do it, you fool. Life is short.
    Great well, surgery is scheduled for xmas break. Im surprised actually, this is the first specialist i've been to that actually knew a thing or two about exercise. His quote which I feel was pretty accurate.

    "I've only seen a couple people do squats and deadlifts properly in my entire life and when form is perfect, there isn't an issue, but once you stray a little bit, stuff can get ugly quick, plus you got 400+ lbs on your back on top of that."

    I went to a neurosurgeon prior who didn't know the difference between a squat and bench press, seriously what the hell? How the hell would anyone let them touch their back. Another orthopedic surgeon was clueless on stuff as well "lifting is bad for you blah blah".

    But apart from that, I really want to keep with the sport. I grew up with little athletic talent. Once i started getting a grip on lifting, diet, and other stuff, i excelled 90% of my peers. I like the general athleticism benefits, i like the added mass (I think im up to 45 lbs of lean mass now over the past 3 years), and everything else that comes with it.

    His advice was to take regular recovery time off (3 months) and then be more creative about how I train as I will statistically always be at risk for reherniation.

    Coach Rip, what would your recommendation be for the future after recovery from surgery. I have heard of people recovering from this sort of thing and setting PRs, etc. As far as upper body goes, I can pretty much do everything but I absolutely have seen how beneficial a strong lower body is.

    I talked to Louie Simmons and he gave me a lot of great advice about strengthening my posterior chain, core, etc. without compressing my back and eventually conditioning myself to return to whatever I want to do. (rev hypers of course, sled pulling, ab work, and ankle weights).

    Do you think i should avoid the deadlifts and squats(have been a big part of my training) and what adaptations should I make?

    Thanks!

  10. #10
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    I think you do what Louie recommends, since he's had lots of personal experience with this very injury.


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