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Thread: using tires instead of bumper plates?

  1. #1

    Default using tires instead of bumper plates?

    i was searching online for bumper plates, and simply put - the fuckers are just expensive. i then figured well maybe someone has some homebrew solution, so i searched - make your own bumper plates.

    i came across this article - http://www.straighttothebar.com/2007...bumper_pl.html

    maybe i've just absolutely been living under a rock or something but - anyone ever tried this? if i used tires and then just added what ever metal plates i wanted on the end (assuming that the plates never made contact with the floor - just the tires did), would my bar ever bend or get effed up?

  2. #2

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    I haven't, I was going to but I think I'm just gonna pony up for the real thing because the tires bounce like crazy I hear.

    Also these might be easier to make
    http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f13/gh...h-baby-701643/

  3. #3
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    I've seen that way of making bumpers (I've hear them called strongman bumpers) and toyed with the idea of making myself a set. The two issues are the temp spare tires I've seen are a little small diameter-wise and I don't have an easy way of making bolt-on
    hubs so they fit on my bar snugly.

    I have also toyed with the idea of buying a minimalist set of Rogue Fitness bumper plates but agree, they aren't real cheap. Good but not cheap.

    Ross Training has some diy equipment links as well.

    ps: I wonder if a person could crack the bead on one side of a temp spare and put some sand in for an increased deadblow effect...
    Last edited by Moving_Target; 02-27-2011 at 08:43 PM.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moving_Target View Post
    ps: I wonder if a person could crack the bead on one side of a temp spare and put some sand in for an increased deadblow effect...
    that's genius lol

  5. #5

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    im definitely going to do the tire method - but im just wondering if my bar is safe when i add metal plates on the end - as long as they never hit the ground. i realize its a stupid question, but i just wanna be 100% sure before i start slinging shit around.

    also i def dont care if the tires are bouncy, i just want to start cleans again (i stopped because bar was killing thighs and back once i got to around 200)

  6. #6
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    The only other thing that would bother me about using the temp spare bumper (aka ghetto bumper) is using a 2.5lb plate as the "hub". I just don't see that itty bitty
    cast iron plate standing up to heavy loading. I'd be thinking steel for the hub just for the greater toughness versus the greater brittleness of a thin cast iron plate.

    My bar is the typical end bolted POS and I wouldn't expect it to last long with high drop heights and heavy-ish weights. JMHO.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moving_Target View Post
    I wonder if a person could crack the bead on one side of a temp spare and put some sand in for an increased deadblow effect...
    I was going to suggest removing the valve core and squirting in a bit of expanding foam (You'd want to be sure there wasn't too much in case it blew out the tyre - or maybe drill a few small holes to relieve the pressure - I dunno)
    The issue with sand would be weight - I know we're AFTER weight - but it could be that it's just a bit *too* much. I dunno.

    Cracking the bead could make for a struggle to get it back on, and I'd have guessed sand may well just come back out again over time, but it's worth a try if someone's the experimenting type.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moving_Target View Post
    The only other thing that would bother me about using the temp spare bumper (aka ghetto bumper) is using a 2.5lb plate as the "hub". I just don't see that itty bitty
    cast iron plate standing up to heavy loading. I'd be thinking steel for the hub just for the greater toughness versus the greater brittleness of a thin cast iron plate.

    My bar is the typical end bolted POS and I wouldn't expect it to last long with high drop heights and heavy-ish weights. JMHO.
    I would be worried about the relatively thin "hub" or "flange" plate denting my barbell. I mean it only as thick as a 5lb plate, and if someone is doing cleans with 225lb its a hell of a lot of pressure on that small area.

    I would use these tyre bumpers, but I would be very wary of adding extra plates on each side and expecting the hubs & barbell to stand up.

  9. #9
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    I am going to experiment with some of the ghetto tire bumpers once I get cleared to lift. For those concerned about the 5lbs plate breaking under stress, I don't see that happening just from the weight of the tires and bar. But if you load the bar it may crack. So just use a 10lbs plate and you should be fine. It only adds $10 total to the price of the ghetto bumpers and will only take a couple of more minutes to drill.

    For those interested in relatively "cheap" bumper plates, check out the Rubber Man's Warrior Series economy bumper plates:

    http://fitness.therubberman.com/?pag...FQpf2godXEsGIQ

    They are $1/lbs, about the same as cheap economy cast iron plates and compared to other companies they are practically free. I've emailed the owner and he has cheap shipping as well compared to other companies.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigShot View Post
    I was going to suggest removing the valve core and squirting in a bit of expanding foam (You'd want to be sure there wasn't too much in case it blew out the tyre - or maybe drill a few small holes to relieve the pressure - I dunno)
    The issue with sand would be weight - I know we're AFTER weight - but it could be that it's just a bit *too* much. I dunno.

    Cracking the bead could make for a struggle to get it back on, and I'd have guessed sand may well just come back out again over time, but it's worth a try if someone's the experimenting type.
    I don't know how much deadblow effect using expanding foam would give and besides, it's messy and I doubt it would stand up to repeated dropping either.I would definately not be drilling holes
    into the tire carcass. That would defeat the purpose of using a pneumatic tire in the first place.

    I've popped and reseated enough tire beads in my lifetime (yay being a car guy!) so that wouldn't stop me. Ratchet straps work great for squeezing a stubborn tire back together. If the tire is
    sealed, I can't see how sand could get back out unless the tire/rim got damaged or deflated.

    I like the suggestion of using a "dime" (maybe even doubled "nickel" plates) for the hub. I would feel much more confident strength-wise with this way.

    A trip to the local pick-a-part is in my near future.
    Last edited by Moving_Target; 02-28-2011 at 06:06 PM.

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