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Thread: Now this is interesting...

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    1) From the article : "Looney also noted that interfering with an officer is already a crime and would remain so"

    So all they have to do is determine that you were interfering with the officer... maybe by "inconveniencing or alarming" him/her.

    2) Good luck enforcing this law - cop on cop arrests are amazingly rare.

    But hey... better to have it on the books than not - a tiny step forward is better that nothing.

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    Shouldn't all police officers be liable for arresting people for things that are not illegal? Why do we need laws to point out specific things they can't falsely arrest us for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPMuller View Post
    1) From the article : "Looney also noted that interfering with an officer is already a crime and would remain so"

    So all they have to do is determine that you were interfering with the officer... maybe by "inconveniencing or alarming" him/her.

    2) Good luck enforcing this law - cop on cop arrests are amazingly rare.

    But hey... better to have it on the books than not - a tiny step forward is better that nothing.
    It's not a change in criminal law. It's a right to sue the cop in civil court for damages. The damages get paid for them if the cops were acting reasonably. However, it will make holes in budgets, which will rapidly get translated into changed procedures.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corrie View Post
    Shouldn't all police officers be liable for arresting people for things that are not illegal? Why do we need laws to point out specific things they can't falsely arrest us for?
    Totally agree.

    That's a very, very long way from the current reality. Cops and prosecutors are given a pass for almost everything. Read http://www.theagitator.com/ for a while.

    For example, it is "normal" for SWAT raids to hit the wrong address. They don't even pay for the door.

    It is "normal" for a cop to shoot any dog not on a leash.

    And that's before they actually start having power issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slowjoe View Post
    Totally agree.

    That's a very, very long way from the current reality. Cops and prosecutors are given a pass for almost everything. Read http://www.theagitator.com/ for a while.

    For example, it is "normal" for SWAT raids to hit the wrong address. They don't even pay for the door.

    It is "normal" for a cop to shoot any dog not on a leash.

    And that's before they actually start having power issues.
    Yeah it's pretty scary stuff.

    I recently put a little video camera in my car that turns off and on with the ignition. I figured it would save me if I got into an accident and I wasn't at fault, but I also wanted it to protect myself any time I get pulled over.

    My parents think I'm crazy for it but all it takes is one asshole on a power trip to make your life a living hell. They have a lot of power and it's impossible to challenge a cop's word without some sort of proof of what you are saying, you're going to lose every time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corrie View Post
    Yeah it's pretty scary stuff.

    I recently put a little video camera in my car that turns off and on with the ignition. I figured it would save me if I got into an accident and I wasn't at fault, but I also wanted it to protect myself any time I get pulled over.

    My parents think I'm crazy for it but all it takes is one asshole on a power trip to make your life a living hell. They have a lot of power and it's impossible to challenge a cop's word without some sort of proof of what you are saying, you're going to lose every time.
    Seriously, you should talk to a lawyer about this if you haven't already.

    If a cop sees the camera, there's a serious chance (I'll guess 25% to 50%) that he'll make it a mission to fuck your life up. From my reading, a lot of cops seriously don't want being filmed to become normal. I think they will lose over time, but there have been a number of prosecutions under wire-tapping laws that I've seen mentioned. I'd imagine there have been a lot more I haven't seen mentioned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slowjoe View Post
    If a cop sees the camera, there's a serious chance (I'll guess 25% to 50%) that he'll make it a mission to fuck your life up. From my reading, a lot of cops seriously don't want being filmed to become normal...
    Perhaps things are different down here in the Land of Oz, but most policing organisations are turning to more videoing, in cars, on warrants, stations etc. It makes the police more accountable and in most (not all) cases it has helped more police OUT of trouble rather than in.

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    Yes, while some police do lie, some people also file baseless complaints to deal with an officer they either don't like or who have been paying too close attention to their illicit activities. This is especially popular in LAPD I hear.

    Cameras in cars and use of audio recordings help in that it keeps everyone more honest, but woe to the poor copper who legitimately forgot to turn on his recorder when he really didn't do anything wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Conway View Post
    Yes, while some police do lie, some people also file baseless complaints to deal with an officer they either don't like or who have been paying too close attention to their illicit activities. This is especially popular in LAPD I hear.
    Yup. Started when Joe Parks was chief and he nearly brought LAPD to a standstill with his approach to taking all cops even in the area off the street while they spent months investigating the most specious complaints just as you describe. Of course overtime went to Hell for the rest having to pick up the slack as well as morale and arrests. Parks had no middle ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by Conway View Post
    Cameras in cars and use of audio recordings help in that it keeps everyone more honest, but woe to the poor copper who legitimately forgot to turn on his recorder when he really didn't do anything wrong.
    Yup again, woe betide.

    But all that said, the law is a valid one. Chicago PD, Da' Boyz in Blue I love to hate (and for good reasons I'll detail sometime) were arresting people for making videos last year. I have no problem with such recordings being made. If the cops involved are not doing anything wrong neither should they.

    Cop on cop arrests are indeed rare, but a DA going after them after the fact or Internal Affairs doing likewise are not that unusual.

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