+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36

Thread: Squat form check

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Aarhus, Denmark
    Posts
    127

    Default

    Reduce 10% from 187?

    Also what do you think about my points 2) and 4)? whats causing that?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Yeah, go down to about 170, or whatever weight where you can keep your knees out and your back/abs tight, then resume linear progression from there. It may hurt your ego, but cleaning up these form issues will help you to break through your 226 barrier.

    I still think it would be helpful to see a side-on 90 degree view of your squat to get a clearer idea of what's happening with your bar path.

    Re: point 2 - you may have just set up with your hands and shoulders a little off center relative to the bar.

    Re: point 4 - arm pain from low-bar squatting is quite common. In your case, the bar may be slipping down the back of your shirt, putting pressure on your arms. Do you have chalk? Rub some on the back of your shirt, where the bar sits. This will help. Also, chin ups help heal arm pain from squatting. Consider doing 3 sets of chin ups after every workout as therapy for your arms.
    Last edited by bamzi; 05-03-2012 at 06:21 AM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Aarhus, Denmark
    Posts
    127

    Default

    So i deloaded to 155 on monday. 160 yesterday.
    Should i progress faster than 5 lbs pr workout?

    Obviously easier, but actually still hard. And i really have to remind myself on every rep to pull my knees out. And to stand up fully at the end of the rep.

    So the way i see it i probably have two main form issues:

    1. Lack of total muscle involvement from not getting my knees out
    2. Lack of all-straight bar path from not starting out my bar over mid-foot (not standing fully upright)

    Is the correctly understood?

    My solutions / questions to these problems:

    1. I tried some TUBOW (actually my water bottle and my liquid chalk acting as sticks) at the last set yesterday. Seemed to work pretty well, but wasn't filming so not 100% sure. I did a pretty good job looking down this time i think, and tried to keep my eyes looking at these "TUBOW items" to make sure my knees were kept out.

    Can the bit-too-wide stance be part of this problem as well?

    QUESTION: When do i allow my knees to come back in? I pull them out on the way down, but when can they come back in? Hope you understand the question.

    2. Often finding this hard to remember when i've got (work set) heavy weight on my shoulders and getting tired on the later reps.
    Also i feel like the bar is gonna slip down when i don't have an angle to keep it lying on - if that makes sense.
    I tried putting chalk on the back of my t-shirt, and it probably helped a little.

    QUESTION: Do i really keep my back all straight like this? Is tightening the upper back supposed to be the only thing holding the bar - not any angle or stuff?

    I'm starting to question if i'm maybe doing too-low bar?

    Is this guy doing high or low bar?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...v=-w5F3kViZC4#!
    If that is low bar i feel like mine might be too low??


    As for my point 2 in previous reply: Think you're right, felt like it happened again once, but then i just re-racked and centered the bar a little more.
    Point 4: Tried the chalk thing. And started doing chin ups. I can only do 6 chin ups, so sets not really possible. Also it's not really dead-hang chin ups - simply don't have enough upperbody strength to bodyweight ratio for that.

    As for weight i noticed today i've gone from 92,2 kg (203 lbs) to 98,6 kg (217 lbs) in 9 weeks. So 0,7 kg (1.6 lbs) weight gain pr. week.
    Sounds descent to me, which tells me that i should be eating enough - and since i'm sleeping normally 7-9 hours every night - and that form issues simply must be the reason i (almost) stalled at 230.

    Do you agree?
    Last edited by rasmusDoh; 05-10-2012 at 11:39 AM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Behdad Salimi is doing a high bar squat. Here's a video that shows what you should be emulating for a low bar squat http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYeDp...e_gdata_player

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rasmusDoh View Post
    So the way i see it i probably have two main form issues:

    1. Lack of total muscle involvement from not getting my knees out
    You get your knees out ok. The problem is that you are letting them collapse inwards as you come up out of the hole. Actually, you can see Justin Lascek doing this too on some of his later reps in the video I linked you to.



    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Aarhus, Denmark
    Posts
    127

    Default

    So squatted again yesterday and did my best to not let my knees collapse,
    and to keep the bar over my mid-foot at all times.

    I tried thinking of a "weight through heels" cue i read in here.

    I filmed a side-on 90 degree view as you asked for. I hope these are okay, as i couldn't really figure out other ways to film this angle.

    These are my three work sets, with 171 lbs (77.5 kg). On the first set i had to readjust the bar between rep 2 and 3, so that's what's happening there.





    Can you please comment on my form on these

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    208

    Default

    It's a vast improvement from your original video :-)

    A few nitpicky details to work on now.

    1. Look down at a spot six feet in front of you on the floor. Keep your gaze locked on this spot.

    2. Tighten your abs more - keep your torso more rigid, especially on the ascent. Currently your hips are rising up a bit quicker than everything else, causing your spine to get an exaggerated arch. You must have a very flexible spine, unusual for a guy. Lock it down, keep it rigid and TIGHT.

    You're doing really well at ironing out these form issues.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    208

    Default

    One more thing. I'm not sure from the videos but it looks like you may have the bar a little too low on your back. Is the bar sitting just above the spine of scapula? Watch this video again http://startingstrength.com/index.ph...t_bar_position.

    This video could help with your back control, too. http://startingstrength.com/index.ph...sition_control

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Aarhus, Denmark
    Posts
    127

    Default

    Thanks a lot for the tips! :-)

    I did what you suggested today and it helped tremendously!
    Most of my reps today ended up being really good. Wish i filmed it, but the gym was super busy.

    First i'm now pretty sure that i really did have the bar too low. I placed it a little higher today and went for a bit closer grip to keep the upperback muscles tight for the barbell to lie on.
    It felt much more right, and it wasn't slipping down like it's been doing on a lot of sets lately.

    Second i tried looking at a spot about six feet in front of me. Since there's a mirror like 3 feet in front of me, i kept my focus on a spot on the floor - seen through the mirror. Like trying to emulate looking 6 feet ahead, and then fixing my eyes on that point.

    I feel like it helped a lot to look at the SAME spot during the whole set.
    I think i might have looked down okay before, but different places and looking at myself in the mirror at the end of the rep.
    I don't really understand why i makes such a big difference, but i felt like it really did.

    Third i focused on doing the Valsalva thing and really tightening my abs before each rep. It definitely helped too.

    As for this third point, i do have a belt - but haven't used it after i deloaded.
    Do you think i should start using it again to help me tighten my core even more?
    Or should i wait until i've had a bit more practice with good form?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Great to hear, rasmusDoh :-)

    Re: when to use your belt - it's a tricky question. My instinct would be to wait until you're squat is up around 110-120kg, just to reinforce good form without a belt. But, on the other hand, if you find your back is getting sore, it could be worth giving the belt a try. Experiment and see what works. Alternate sets with and without a belt and see what feels best for you.

    Sent from my GT-I9100

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts