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Thread: Texas method for powerlifting

  1. #1

    Default Texas method for powerlifting

    First off, being big and strong makes a huge difference when playing rugby. Thanks for writing the books.

    I've decided to enter in a powerlifting meet that takes place on the 23rd of November. Just to give the sport a try and compete in the sub-junior category while I still can.

    Now this decision comes just as I've decided to transition from a linear program that was more or less SS (with 5x5 because the internet told me to, but don't worry, I replaced rows with power cleans ages ago) to the Texas method. As I'm unlikely to have to compete in the clean and press, would it make sense to drop those lifts from my program until the powerlifting meet is over? Leaving me doing something like this every week for the next 8 weeks:

    Mon:
    Squats 5x5
    Bench 5x5
    Deadlifts 1x5

    Wed:
    Front Squats 3x3
    Dumbbell BP 3x10
    Light pulling 2x10, RDLs?

    Fri:
    Squat 1/2/3 RM
    Bench 1/2/3 RM
    Deadlift 1/2/3 RM

    The program I was going to try before getting interested in this powerlifting meet would have had me switching deadlifts and BP with power cleans and OHP on a weekly basis. 1.) Is omitting the press/clean week going to have me benching and deadlifting too heavy too often and cause overtraining? 2.) Is leaving out explosive pulling a bad idea? 3.) Are the 3x3 front squats from the PP squat template supposed to be done heavy because of the FS emphasis on the quads and low volume?

    I want to bring my big three up as much as possible before the competition, but as this is my first experience with intermediate programming I'm a little wary of overtraining, and don't want to do anything stupid without realizing it.

    I'm 18, 185lbs, GOMAD fanatically, and get plenty of sleep.
    Freshly tested 1RMs for SQ/BP/DL are 390/200/420.

  2. #2
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    I think you're making a mistake to drop the clean before a power meet. You can use the old George Hechter method and warm up your deadlifts by doing cleans up to a max triple, and then continue on up through your deadlift warmups to your work sets. And you'd get more out of presses on Wed. than DB benches, because of the posterior stability you get from pressing. Just drop them about 3 weeks out. And I'd do low box squats on Wed. instead of front squats, because quad strength will not be an issue at the PL meet.


  3. #3

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    Coach, is it wise to do 1x5 deadlifts on the same day as 5x5 squats for an intermediate lifter?

  4. #4
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    Since you have to do them both at the meet, it's wise to prepare.


  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Since you have to do them both at the meet, it's wise to prepare.
    Doesn't heavy squatting prior to deadlifting limit how much you can pull? I understand if you're preparing for a meet, but if you just want to get as strong as possible on the deadlift, would training the squat first hurt your deadlift progress?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    I think you're making a mistake to drop the clean before a power meet. You can use the old George Hechter method and warm up your deadlifts by doing cleans up to a max triple, and then continue on up through your deadlift warmups to your work sets. And you'd get more out of presses on Wed. than DB benches, because of the posterior stability you get from pressing. Just drop them about 3 weeks out. And I'd do low box squats on Wed. instead of front squats, because quad strength will not be an issue at the PL meet.
    This all makes sense to me, and I especially like the George Hechter method of warming up for deadlifts. Thanks a lot.

  7. #7
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    Heavy squatting prior to deadlifting does produce fatigue, but the deadlift is a shorter range of movement lift that is already being done with a heavier weight than your squat sets, so it all comes out in the wash.


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