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Starting Strength Weekly Report


December 10, 2018


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Training Log
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In the Trenches

anna cannington squat
Anna Cannington's last set of squats during the Starting Strength Seminar held at WFAC last weekend. [photo courtesy of Nick Delgadillo]
brandon mid-thigh position in the clean
Brandon Tingstrom nails the mid-thigh jump position during the power clean platform session at the Starting Strength Seminar held at WFAC. [photo courtesy of Nick Delgadillo]


Best of the Week

Returning from a long layoff
robber82

I started strength training again about a month ago after a 3-year leave. When I stopped lifting, I had taken up the SS program for about 2 months and experienced some decent gains after several years spinning my wheels. Where I ended and where I'm at now is as follows:

Previously: 33 years old

  • 6'2 190 lbs.
  • Squat 335 3x5
  • Bench 215 3x5
  • Press 140 3x5
  • DL 375 3x5

Now: age 36

  • 6'2 175
  • Squat 235 3x5
  • Bench 155 3x5
  • Press 100 3x5
  • DL 265 3x5

Oouch! I'm determined to get back to where I was as a medium-term goal, however, I'm not sure if I should keep up SS again for as long as possible or other? Is the effect lost? The other caveat is I am paying recreational hockey 1-2 times per week. Any suggestions on the best way to move forward would be appreciated. I know I need to continue to eat!

Pete Troupos

Welcome back.  I'm not sure what you mean by: “I’m not sure if I should keep up SS again for as long as possible or other? Is the effect lost?” Are you talking about the novice linear progression?

robber82

Yes, that's what I was referring to. I was hoping somebody had experience with this scenario, working with someone after a long layoff. Very simply I guess my question is, will linear progression still work well for me, and is it the best program to get back on track even though I've already gone through this once before? There were a couple times years ago when I had a few weeks or perhaps a few months off I would come back and gains came back extremely quick, the "muscle memory" thing.

Pete Troupos

Yes, I think after a layoff that running an LP back up is a fine idea. You may find that you're able to take bigger jumps than before or may be able to surpass where you left off on your previous LP. Also consider that you're 15 lbs lighter, and make sure you're eating for sustained performance.


Best of the Forum

Building A Platform
Bradley Gish

Does Rip have a video for constructing one? I searched YouTube but couldn't find anything. Any useful links would be greatly appreciated. I know that there are instructions in SS, but a video demonstration would be helpful. Thanks!

stef

No.

Not sure how watching someone else stacking a few pieces of plywood +/ rubber and securing them could be helpful at all. Unless you were watching someone else do the minimal bit of labor for you while you watched them do it.

Is there some part you're unclear on?

Bradley Gish

Well, no, I'm pretty clear on it. The instructions in the book are pretty clear. I admit, I'm not the best builder but my carpenter buddy is going to help me out, and no, I'm not just going to sit there and watch. I'm going to lend a helping hand however I can. I purchased two 4x6 pieces of trailer mat yesterday (I'm decently strong and that was kind of a task in itself hauling those things by myself). I'm going to purchase plywood later this week. I want to follow the specs in SS3 as close as possible. My power rack has slightly different dimensions than the one in the book, so modifications will have to be taken into account for that. To my defense, Rip has a video for just about everything else, from: oiling your bar, building a dumbbell rack, and managing callouses, so I just figured that he may have made one about building a platform.

stef

The platform is simple, really. What you want to be careful of is that you end up with a platform that is the correct height against the rack. Plywood dimensions are actual dimensions (4' x 8' x 3/4", example) which makes is nice for those who aren't used to 2x4 fictions.

Now, if you want a video, Rip does give a mean lesson on handling and cutting rubber...but you'd have to visit WFAC for full effect. Nick Delgadillo can confirm.

Nick Delgadillo

It was quite insightful. As were the lessons on tree pruning, Texas pecan varieties, North Texas weather patterns, and serving on the grand jury.


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