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Thread: Stopping the Spread of Misinflammation

  1. #1
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    Default Stopping the Spread of Misinflammation

    by Jonathon Sullivan

    “The one thing everybody knows about inflammation, even your dog, is that it sucks. Your injured paw (or whatever) is hot, swollen, tender, and throbbing, and it doesn’t work so well. Chasing that squirrel just isn’t as interesting as it was a minute ago. Inflammation is nature’s way of saying: “You just f*cked up. Maybe you should stop and limp on home.”

    Article

    Resources page

  2. #2

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    First!

    Xfitters like to do dumb in a big way.

    Some of Kelly Starrett's stuff is pretty good, but he can't speak the english language and uses too many nonsense phrases. This is a glimpse into the future of communication in this country, I'm afraid to say. It reminds me of the way people spoke in Idiocracy.

  3. #3

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    Took me an hour to fully read but well worth the time. Not to diminish the technical explanation, which was great, but the inscription on the axe was what made this piece art. More kickass stuff by Sully!

  4. #4

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    fantastic read, thanks!

  5. #5
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    Thank you for the detailed explanation of the multiple processes. You are an awesome resource.

    Your thesis appears to be this: "the critical deciding factor in whether to take
    NSAIDs or cryotherapy for training-associated pain is whether they make you feel better. And that’s
    good news, because when it comes to the science of you, an N=1 observation is practical and relevant.
    It’s difficult if not impossible to tell whether NSAIDs reduce your time to heal."

    If we don't/cannot know whether inflmmation reducing measures (ice, NSAIDS etc,.) interfere with healing and recovery, shouldn't the default ('do no harm") position be to not use them? Pain is mental and temporary. Training discipline is all mental. It seems that training soreness should be embraced, sucked up and worked through. Trainees should learn to recognize the different types of pain (overuse soreness versus traumatic carilage tear, for example) and how to train/work through or rest where appropriate. Since you seem to agree that reducing inflammation is NOT going to cause FASTER healing, shouldn't we be erring on the side of caution here and avoid ice and nsaids?

  6. #6
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    Just wanted to say that it was a fascinating article. Thank you for writing it.

  7. #7
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    Sully,

    Incredibly well written article. Who did the art work? It was fantastic! Frustrating to read, of course, because in the end, there isn't an absolute answer to the problem. We use alot of recovery techniques at STRONG, but we also understand that MOST of these techniques are done to help the lifter "feel" better. We do seem to get really good "feel" results from:
    - Liniment use pre training.
    - Foam rolling, roller stick, lacross ball, and manual myofascial release pre-training
    - Compression during training
    - Systemic cryotherapy immediately after training, especially since we are usually incredibly hot afterwards. This just makes most people "feel" better.
    - Then using hot tubs, liniment, intense myofascial release for major problem areas and compression for minor problem usually works really well post-cryotherapy.

    All in all though - its possible that none of that helps. But it "feels" like it. ;-)

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Reynolds View Post
    Sully,

    Incredibly well written article. Who did the art work? It was fantastic! Frustrating to read, of course, because in the end, there isn't an absolute answer to the problem. We use alot of recovery techniques at STRONG, but we also understand that MOST of these techniques are done to help the lifter "feel" better. We do seem to get really good "feel" results from:
    - Liniment use pre training.
    - Foam rolling, roller stick, lacross ball, and manual myofascial release pre-training
    - Compression during training
    - Systemic cryotherapy immediately after training, especially since we are usually incredibly hot afterwards. This just makes most people "feel" better.
    - Then using hot tubs, liniment, intense myofascial release for major problem areas and compression for minor problem usually works really well post-cryotherapy.

    All in all though - its possible that none of that helps. But it "feels" like it. ;-)
    Aren't mental benefits enough? 99.99% of the population will not get under a heavy barbell for mental reasons. Whatever helps the other .01% is good.

    For me, the obvious reason to ice is that an injury is hot. What do you do when something is too hot? You cool it off. I doubt the ancients had any difficulty seeing this.

  9. #9
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    Yesler's Palace, Seattle, WA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FatButWeak View Post
    If we don't/cannot know whether inflmmation reducing measures (ice, NSAIDS etc,.) interfere with healing and recovery, shouldn't the default ('do no harm") position be to not use them? Pain is mental and temporary. Training discipline is all mental. It seems that training soreness should be embraced, sucked up and worked through. Trainees should learn to recognize the different types of pain (overuse soreness versus traumatic carilage tear, for example) and how to train/work through or rest where appropriate. Since you seem to agree that reducing inflammation is NOT going to cause FASTER healing, shouldn't we be erring on the side of caution here and avoid ice and nsaids?
    No. Sully is saying we don't know whether or not icing or NSAIDS retard OR speed healing, because the size of their impact is likely to be small enough to get swamped out by other factors, and is thus very difficult to test for in an effective manner.

    Not using them in order to build "character", as you seem to be suggesting, is silly. Nor is pain "mental", I'd like to add. There is a mental component, yes, but the pain response is quite physical and has quite a number of physiological components and effects, I assure you.

  10. #10
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    Flagstaff, AZ
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    I have noticed better training adaptation without the use of NSAIDs. But without the use of NSAIDs during the previous training cycle, I would have been lagging in my training to begin with. I guess the NSAIDs worked... even when I wasn't using them.

    when it comes to the science of you, an N=1 observation is practical and relevant.

    judicious doses of both skepticism and curiosity toward all ideas, old and new.

    The best part of that video is this paper.

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