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Thread: Aspiring coach- first client

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
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    5

    Default Aspiring coach- first client

    • starting strength seminar october 2022
    • starting strength seminar december 2022
    • starting strength seminar february 2023
    Looking for some help with my first client: super motivated 32 year old who weighs 258 at 6’. Some, prior barbell training (no history of low bar squats) and new to SS. Out of shape, with no recent history of training or gym-going.

    Some issues that we encountered:
    Squats-
    With the bar in the correct position on the back, client stated he could not straighten his wrists to align them with his forearms. He could straighten his wrists out, but it also meant raising the bar into an incorrect position. After warming up the issue did not resolve, but became less pronounced.

    Deadlifts-
    When in the start position, client had a large degree of thoractic flexion. Lumbar spine looked decent by comparison. But the mid back looked like a small mountain.

    With both of these, they aren’t issues I encountered during my NLP and I found myself at a loss for offering cues or advice. I figure this has happened 10,000 times before, and was curious how I should help my client approach these issues.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    2,160

    Default

    Congratulations on your first client. That's a huge first step. I remember the first person I ever taught how to squat.

    What did you try to do to correct these issues?
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    I answer all my emails: ALewis@StartingStrengthGyms.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
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    5

    Default

    For the squat we widened his grip about 2-3 inches on each side, we had some improvement but were unable to get “correct” even at an excessively wide grip. I recommended we take a slightly wider grip than normal, and maintain correct bar position on the back; with the idea that after sometime flexibility will improve.

    As for his deadlift.. client (he) was diagnosed with kyphosis as a teenager and his current occupation over 10 years has only exaggerated it. When lying flat on his back and keeping his head in a “normal” anatomical position his head is approximately 3” from the ground. His low back exhibits some rounding, but I can cue him to resolve almost all of it. He states that he has no pain deadlifting, and wants to continue to pull aside from the medical issues.

    Worked on getting press mechanics down yesterday, and the second session went MUCH more smooth than the first. Those first day nerves are no joke and you really see what you do and don’t know.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    49,596

    Default

    What are the "medical issues" you referred to?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Posts
    5

    Default

    He was diagnosed with throactic kyphosis around the age of 17; not caused by a car accident or any sort of traumatic injury. No other medical Hx that he is aware of.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    49,596

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    We deal with people who have a thoracic kyphosis all the time. It is not a "medical issue" any more than flat feet are a medical issue. Come to a seminar and learn to coach. These are the people that teach you the most.

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