Switch squat to TM "early?" Switch squat to TM "early?"

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Thread: Switch squat to TM "early?"

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Default Switch squat to TM "early?"

    I've reached the point in advanced novice LP where each jump is taking two tries so I'm effectively only progressing once per week. Is it okay to switch to TM so I could progress at the same rate with less missed reps.

    Details: 5'10", 189 lbs, 27 yo, gaining weight at .5lb./week.

    315x5x3 took two attemps (first attempt 5,5,4)
    After that I had a session with David Abdemoulaie and deloaded to fix some form issues. A couple of weeks later got 315x5x3 and 320x5x3 on first tries.

    First attempt at 325 got 5,5,4 last monday. I threw in an "medium day" on Friday because I had gotten shitty sleep all week. Got 325x5x3 on Monday. Today attempted 330 and got 5,5,3.

    So other than 320 which was coming off a deload, each weight from 315 up has taken two attempts. Would switching my squat to TM make sense? I think missing reps today may have negatively affected my cleans.

    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
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    I'd start doing one top set plus 2 back offs and keep on your LP. The third set seems to be the one you are missing, but the first set is still cruising for fives

  3. #3
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    Thanks! For some reason, I forgot about that option. I see in PP that you recommend 5-10% reduction in weight which is 15-35 lbs in my case. When trying to "feel out" how much of an offset works for me, is it a good rule of thumb to say that the third set, done well tired, should feel similar to the first one? Or is there a better way to do this?

  4. #4
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    back offs should be hard, but form should hold and you shouldnt miss reps

  5. #5
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    Apr 2015
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    Related question (sorry I was a few days late to this):

    In practical programming, it recommends either (1) one set of five plus two back-off sets or (2) 3x3. Any reason why you recommended the former in this case? And generally speaking what are the circumstances that would make 3x3 a better option?

    I have not failed any squat reps yet, but I was very close to failing my last rep during my last workout. Last workout was 3x5 @ 455, so no surprises it was hard, but what I mean is that bar speed has slowed in the last two sessions, and I have been more sore/tired than normal. Currently taking about 6 minutes between sets. Any thoughts on which direction I should go next?

    (Note: As of two weeks ago I am doing a light (80%) squat day on my middle day, so I've already implemented that part of the recommended advanced novice programming. Can provide more info if it is helpful.)

    Thanks in advance!

  6. #6
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    The back off method is most useful when the lifter has fallen into a pattern of always getting the first set of 5, but then having a sharp drop off on sets 2 and 3. However, if the lifter starts missing on the first set too, then we just drop all sets to 3x3.

    As a rule, lifters will get longer runs on the back off method. Not because the method is necessarily better, but the lifter who needs it, tends to be in a state of less overall fatigue then the lifter who needs the latter.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    157

    Default

    Thanks, Andy. That's helpful.

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