Well there it is. . Well there it is. . - Page 2

starting strength gym
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26

Thread: Well there it is. .

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    7,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff LC View Post
    He was doing it in the squat rack.
    My first reaction was "JFC, OF COURSE he was."

    But then I remembered that in lots of globo gyms, the only place there is an actual place to do chins at all is the bar across the top of the rack. Not sure if that's the case here but at least I attempted to judge favorably. if it is, of course you should always be courteous to the people who need to use the rack for barbell lifts and coordinate to work in when they're resting, not just monopolize the rack for chins. Strapped chins. I'm guessing this guy didn't do that. So much for judging favorably.
    YT * IG * FB

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    450

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Wolf View Post
    Right. The main thing I'd point out for a beginner is:
    DOUBLE OVERHAND GRIP IS NOT A HILL TO DIE ON.

    I see this mistake a lot. New lifters don't realize (even though it's referenced in the book) that when your grip isn't super duper secure, the rest of your muscles won't fire as hard, either. They pick up on a vibe that they should double overhand until they can't anymore, and take it VERY literally, and get stuck because they think the weight at which their DOH grip fails must be too light and they have to push through it.

    No. Just no. You DOH as long as you can generally, not on a literal "till the bar falls out of your hands" level. Since newbies don't know when grip is becoming a limiting factor, my rule of thumb is that, however many reps you're doing (presumably five but even if not), you should be able to hold the last rep up at the top at lockout for at least 3 seconds. If you can't do that, you need to switch your grip IMMEDIATELY because your reps are already affected by the lack of grip security, and failure is closer than you think.

    For the switch to hook or mixed, some corollaries to that:

    1. If you're going to use a hook grip when it gets too heavy to double overhand, start building up to it in your warm-up sets 4-5 workouts out to save yourself a lot of pain. It'll still hurt, but tolerably so.
    2. If you're going to use a mixed grip, do it for every rep and every set the first 3-4 times, because it will feel real awkward and the extra exposures will help you acclimate early on. After that, just start doing it one set before you truly need it so you don't go into that set changing something.
    3. For Pete's sake, DO NOT DIE ON THE HILL OF DOUBLE OVERHAND GRIP. Seriously. Stop this idiocy.
    lolz

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    7,472

    Default

    heh. That's like the lifting version of dad jokes, Fulcrum.
    YT * IG * FB

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    60

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff LC View Post
    Literally saw a guy chinning with straps yesterday for my first time ever, what a coincidence. He was doing it in the squat rack.
    There's a guy who does chins with straps at my gym, too. In a squat rack. The one I prefer, in fact. And only 3/4 range of motion, of course.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Kingwood TX
    Posts
    8,880

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Wolf View Post
    Right. The main thing I'd point out for a beginner is:
    DOUBLE OVERHAND GRIP IS NOT A HILL TO DIE ON.

    I see this mistake a lot. New lifters don't realize (even though it's referenced in the book) that when your grip isn't super duper secure, the rest of your muscles won't fire as hard, either. They pick up on a vibe that they should double overhand until they can't anymore, and take it VERY literally, and get stuck because they think the weight at which their DOH grip fails must be too light and they have to push through it.

    No. Just no. You DOH as long as you can generally, not on a literal "till the bar falls out of your hands" level. Since newbies don't know when grip is becoming a limiting factor, my rule of thumb is that, however many reps you're doing (presumably five but even if not), you should be able to hold the last rep up at the top at lockout for at least 3 seconds. If you can't do that, you need to switch your grip IMMEDIATELY because your reps are already affected by the lack of grip security, and failure is closer than you think.

    For the switch to hook or mixed, some corollaries to that:

    1. If you're going to use a hook grip when it gets too heavy to double overhand, start building up to it in your warm-up sets 4-5 workouts out to save yourself a lot of pain. It'll still hurt, but tolerably so.
    2. If you're going to use a mixed grip, do it for every rep and every set the first 3-4 times, because it will feel real awkward and the extra exposures will help you acclimate early on. After that, just start doing it one set before you truly need it so you don't go into that set changing something.
    3. For Pete's sake, DO NOT DIE ON THE HILL OF DOUBLE OVERHAND GRIP. Seriously. Stop this idiocy.
    I have done dozens of coaching sessions with lifters who came to see me because they had been stuck on Deadlifts for months at like 275, some having done multiple resets back to 225 etc. And very very frequently the issue was the insistence on staying with the DOH grip. There seemed to be common thread in their thinking that somehow a mixed or hook grip only helped a little - like maybe 5-10 lbs. No idea where this came from, but most enjoy setting a 40-50 lb PR just by flipping a hand underneath. This post should have been written years ago. Nicely done Wolf.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    82

    Default

    To me, unless you are competing, alternating grip and hook grip are the same as using straps.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    38,668

    Default

    To you?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Kingwood TX
    Posts
    8,880

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DoinFives View Post
    To me, unless you are competing, alternating grip and hook grip are the same as using straps.
    So the Deadlift is a grip exercise? Not a hip, back, and legs exercise?

    And you do understand that your DOH grip will actually get stronger by training heavier with a mixed or hook grip right?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    285

    Default

    I think he had a different point:

    Unless you're competing, might as well use straps.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    82

    Default

    @andybaker

    I just wanted to point out that obviously hook grip and alternating grip offer a mechanical advantage that double overhand grip does not. From my experience alternating grip offers an equal advantage to straps. Iím not so sure about hook grip, as I gave up on using it for deadlift.

    I just get the feeling that there is a stigma against straps for deadlift that is all.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •