Training a 14yr old Training a 14yr old

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Thread: Training a 14yr old

  1. #1
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    Default Training a 14yr old

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    Hi, I am training my son to throw the iron around. My question is how important is the 2 days off while using a 3 day standard routine? Thanks

  2. #2
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    From physiology perspective - depends. If you ask him to train heavy than it is very important.

    But you should not make your kid lift heavy at this age. If he likes it than work at his form, progress very slowly, give him some food and he will become stronger just by geting older.

  3. #3
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    Szymon I would partially disagree pending on where the kid is at in terms of puberty. If he's far enough along (tanner stage 3 or 4 I believe) then there's nothing wrong with the kid running LP. That being said use common sense, start reasonably with the weight there is no need to be in a rush. Lastly, don't be a dick head dad that forces his kid into strength training. If he likes it show him the ropes and maybe he'll develop a passion for it. Now if the kid still has to wait on Mother Nature to get moving then yes, working technique and teaching him parts of the process on his terms is the route to go.

    As for the OP I believe the 3 days off just makes the LP program fit nicely into a 7 day week. As the weights start getting heavy that split from day 3 (Friday) to day 1 (Monday) can add some extra recovery time. In principle by definition a novice can go through the Stress, Recovery and Adaptation cycle in 48-72 hours once that stops adjustments towards Intermediate programming would begin (examples would be adding a light squat day or switching to 5 sets of 3 on bench/press).

  4. #4
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    Kyle Stevens, agreed. Some kids grow faster then the others. Recently I read a long term study on antropometrics of kids. For exemple, menstruation cycle on average starts 9 months erlier than 20 years ago. So it could be that a 14 year old boy is ready to be introduced to more intense training.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MISSINGLINK View Post
    Hi, I am training my son to throw the iron around. My question is how important is the 2 days off while using a 3 day standard routine? Thanks
    I would speculate that it's not that important. It probably only exists to fit around the 7 day week. Try it and see.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MISSINGLINK View Post
    Hi, I am training my son to throw the iron around. My question is how important is the 2 days off while using a 3 day standard routine? Thanks
    Very important IMO because if followed strictly this style or programming doesn't include any planned de-loads or cycles. You don't want to burn the kid out. If you start taking time off or missing days then adjust accordingly.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Stevens View Post
    Szymon I would partially disagree pending on where the kid is at in terms of puberty. If he's far enough along (tanner stage 3 or 4 I believe) then there's nothing wrong with the kid running LP. That being said use common sense, start reasonably with the weight there is no need to be in a rush. Lastly, don't be a dick head dad that forces his kid into strength training. If he likes it show him the ropes and maybe he'll develop a passion for it. Now if the kid still has to wait on Mother Nature to get moving then yes, working technique and teaching him parts of the process on his terms is the route to go.

    As for the OP I believe the 3 days off just makes the LP program fit nicely into a 7 day week. As the weights start getting heavy that split from day 3 (Friday) to day 1 (Monday) can add some extra recovery time. In principle by definition a novice can go through the Stress, Recovery and Adaptation cycle in 48-72 hours once that stops adjustments towards Intermediate programming would begin (examples would be adding a light squat day or switching to 5 sets of 3 on bench/press).
    Quote Originally Posted by Szymon View Post
    From physiology perspective - depends. If you ask him to train heavy than it is very important.

    But you should not make your kid lift heavy at this age. If he likes it than work at his form, progress very slowly, give him some food and he will become stronger just by geting older.
    Thank you for the responses. I greatly appreciate it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Szymon View Post
    Kyle Stevens, agreed. Some kids grow faster then the others. Recently I read a long term study on antropometrics of kids. For exemple, menstruation cycle on average starts 9 months erlier than 20 years ago. So it could be that a 14 year old boy is ready to be introduced to more intense training.
    I would agree that kids on average are hitting puberty a bit faster. But very definitely it is case to case. I work with a lot of young kids in our school weight room/PE classes and it seems by 7th grade most of the girls are far enough along to train, but only about 1/2 of the boys are at the same point. For sure though I can't recommend enough that you shouldn't force ANY kid to train or lift, seen too many dads reliving their glory days that ruin sports for kids. If you have to drag them into the weight room it will not end well. Show them how to do things correctly on their time and work in some fun stuff, they are still kids even at 14.

  9. #9
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    Jun 2019
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    My 14 year old cousin is big into baseball and he is on a moderately unsupervised off-season conditioning program. I bought him the book and gave it to him as a present. He was very appreciative, maybe he'll read it. Maybe share the book / materials before the iron?

  10. #10
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