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  1. #11
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    • wichita falls texas december seminar 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Spicka View Post
    Appreciate the comments Bill. I guess I just have to be ok with hiking more!

    If I could have softened the down steps a bit we might not be having this conversation.
    That's me, as a younger man, I never used poles, but now in an older man's body, poles are my friend. I don't use them on the straights, but they help with the footing on the up and down hills. And they are a knee saver for the steep downhills.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Boggs View Post
    That's me, as a younger man, I never used poles, but now in an older man's body, poles are my friend. I don't use them on the straights, but they help with the footing on the up and down hills. And they are a knee saver for the steep downhills.
    Getting ready for my next mountain. I will bring the poles. Saving the joints will make a huge difference. Outside of my calves being a little sore 2 days later my muscles work well. I could have used some cardio training which would have sped me me up.

    I think I want to get a prowler but the only place I have to use it would be in front of my house on the asvault. Do I need anything special or just grind down the metal and buy a new one?

  3. #13
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    Jul 2019
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    When I got back to hiking after SS I just focused on the hip drive in every step.

    Make sure that the backpack is real snug around the hips and a bit loose around the chest. If the ruck wants to pull you back you are leading with the chest (not correct). Just drive up in each and every step. You might have to do the valsalva manouver when it gets steep but at least youll avoid the injuries. I can review a video of your rucking if youd like.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturw View Post
    When I got back to hiking after SS I just focused on the hip drive in every step.

    Make sure that the backpack is real snug around the hips and a bit loose around the chest. If the ruck wants to pull you back you are leading with the chest (not correct). Just drive up in each and every step. You might have to do the valsalva manouver when it gets steep but at least youll avoid the injuries. I can review a video of your rucking if youd like.
    I have never thought of my rucking technique. Had to watch a few videos on it. Im not sure how much consistency I will be able to get in my rucking. The terrain might vary too much. Ill watch some videos and see what I can come up with.

    Much of the hiking, I feel like I be more worried about just being sure a stable footing.

    To throw a monkey wrench in everything, my buddy wrecked his bicycle getting ready for our trip. Pretty good crash at 28 mph. Nothing broken thank goodness. This might shorten our trip a bit., but wont know for a few days.

  5. #15
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    The technique is just about the same as when low bar squatting. Just a good drive up, leaning over so that the ruck is carried over the mid foot. Dont forget the deep breath.

    Important though that you follow this through on e a c h and every step. Relaxing and just strolling around is for when you take a break.

    Stable footing comes from stable shoes. You might want to try some insert soles with a slight angle (if you are used to lifting shoes) in order to que the muscles correctly.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Spicka View Post
    Getting ready for my next mountain. I will bring the poles. Saving the joints will make a huge difference. Outside of my calves being a little sore 2 days later my muscles work well. I could have used some cardio training which would have sped me me up.
    There's a few bits for using the poles. First is the grip, look on youtube or visit any good hiking store and they'll be able to show how. Second is length, long for downhill and short for uphill. For straights, I find using the poles slow me down, easier and quicker to just carry them.

  7. #17
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    I watched a few videos on them. Im thinking its the downhills where I will enjoy them the most.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sturw View Post
    The technique is just about the same as when low bar squatting. Just a good drive up, leaning over so that the ruck is carried over the mid foot. Dont forget the deep breath.

    Important though that you follow this through on e a c h and every step. Relaxing and just strolling around is for when you take a break.

    Stable footing comes from stable shoes. You might want to try some insert soles with a slight angle (if you are used to lifting shoes) in order to que the muscles correctly.
    I had not thought much about rucking technique. That also reminded me of careful pack weight planning. It looks like you want to keep the heaviest weight tight to your back between the shoulder blades and lower, which seems logical because thats normally where the water dromedary sits.

  8. #18
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    If you are using dromedary: put it as low as you can. Drinking the fluid will shift the weight quite a lot. You want the most of the weight just below the spine of the scapula. With a tight hip belt, you should be OK if the weight distribution stays the same. Just lean over so youre above the middle of the foot with the weight and then hip drive every step. Better have protein shake in the dromedary so that you do not go into muscle atrophy whilst away from the barbell.

    I believe the swiss army mountaineers has some videos on good rucking technique with hip drive. Ill try and get a link, otherwise try the internet.

    Do revert of you want me to have a glance at your walking hip drive. Id say youd better work on that before considering poles (which would be similar to straps in the deadlift: cheat is not neat).

    Stay strong and hip drive your way to the top. Best of luck.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sturw View Post
    If you are using dromedary: put it as low as you can. Drinking the fluid will shift the weight quite a lot. You want the most of the weight just below the spine of the scapula. With a tight hip belt, you should be OK if the weight distribution stays the same. Just lean over so youre above the middle of the foot with the weight and then hip drive every step. Better have protein shake in the dromedary so that you do not go into muscle atrophy whilst away from the barbell.

    I believe the swiss army mountaineers has some videos on good rucking technique with hip drive. Ill try and get a link, otherwise try the internet.

    Do revert of you want me to have a glance at your walking hip drive. Id say youd better work on that before considering poles (which would be similar to straps in the deadlift: cheat is not neat).

    Stay strong and hip drive your way to the top. Best of luck.
    How much I use the poles I dont know. I'm guessing I'll find the more useful going down hill. Thats where I wanted them during Longs. The trip up wasnt to bad after my hips got used to the assent.

    I will study the rucking more and see if I cant figure out the hip druuhhhhhive.

    Just got the route and it will be the 5th and 6th leg of the Colorado Trail. The 5th will be a good warmup for the 6th.

    What I think Im lacking is cardio. Im thinking of either biking or running 3 days a week to build some up. Thoughts?

  10. #20
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    Jul 2019
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    starting strength coach development program
    For conditioning (and hiking practice): pack about half of your hiking stuff (or any similar weight) and just do really high intensity hip drive walks. The higher cadence on the hip going up and down the better (more reps in the tank). Aim for at least 90 reps (one step or one up and down with the hip is one rep) each minute, but do not run (since running is another type of movement). You will be as strong and fast as a mountain goat my fellow internet stranger.

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