Starting Strength principles for Weighted Calisthenics Starting Strength principles for Weighted Calisthenics

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Thread: Starting Strength principles for Weighted Calisthenics

  1. #1
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    Default Starting Strength principles for Weighted Calisthenics

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    Hello guys i have a question , do you think that SS rules also works for a program based on Weighted Pull-Ups and Weighted Dips and other exercises ?

    For example :

    3x5 Weighted Pull-Ups ...

    3x5 Weighted Dips ...

    I add 2.5 kg everytime i complete the 3x5 , then when i stall with the same weight for 3 times in a row i deload by 90% in that exercise , returning my way back up

    Can it work in your opinion ? I wonder if it's the same even if the exercises are not Squat , Deadlift , etc ...

  2. #2
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    Don't know. Never thought about it. Try it, and let us know!

  3. #3
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    If you mean it's the same in terms of overall strenght gains and muscle gains, it's not, cause the mechanics of the movements are very different, you are mostly hanging instead of standing on your feet, and you are using less muscle mass.
    If you are doing a linear progression you will see results in increasing weight for sure as you get stronger at doing calisthenics training, but I don't think there's a lot of carry over from calisthenics to barbell training since the mechanics involved are different, but if it's something you absolutely wanna do and you hate barbells, this is probably the best way to get stronger while doing it

  4. #4
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    Francesco, please stop posting just because you want to type on the board. This is a stupid question from someone who has not read the books or this website, and it does not merit an answer.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Francesco, please stop posting just because you want to type on the board. This is a stupid question from someone who has not read the books or this website, and it does not merit an answer.
    I understand, wasting time on someone who is already mentally lazy is useless and I can see your point of view in responding sarcastically, but he probably doesn't know that you are being sarcastic so he's gonna think you adviced him to do that. Isn't it better to just tell him he's way off cause he hasn't informed himself on what the method is about? I think it's an honest mistake frome someone who might have just begun their training and is overlapping different methods and concepts in search of something good.

    I know you don't have the time to answer these type of questions and are tired of hearing about it, but I have the time and am allowed to reply, right?

    I appreciate your comment anyway

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by francesco.decaro View Post
    If you mean it's the same in terms of overall strenght gains and muscle gains, it's not, cause the mechanics of the movements are very different, you are mostly hanging instead of standing on your feet, and you are using less muscle mass.
    If you are doing a linear progression you will see results in increasing weight for sure as you get stronger at doing calisthenics training, but I don't think there's a lot of carry over from calisthenics to barbell training since the mechanics involved are different, but if it's something you absolutely wanna do and you hate barbells, this is probably the best way to get stronger while doing it
    First of all thank you for your reply ...
    I want to do it because i like the principles of this linear progression , and yes , i'm not interested at all in training with barbells or the classic gym exercises
    I think it should work , these two are usually used as accessory lifts but you can lift a lot on both , even more than +80 kg on Dips and +60 kg on Pull-Ups

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaetano View Post
    First of all thank you for your reply ...
    I want to do it because i like the principles of this linear progression , and yes , i'm not interested at all in training with barbells or the classic gym exercises
    I think it should work , these two are usually used as accessory lifts but you can lift a lot on both , even more than +80 kg on Dips and +60 kg on Pull-Ups
    Ok so the principle you are talking about is simple progressive overload which is not the only thing about this method. I still think you should try and read the books, barbell training can be a lot more beneficial to you if your main goal is overall strength, and it does include chin-ups in the novice phase and eventually you could do other assistance exercises like dips.
    If you are a novice, i.e never trained with barbells or have only been exercising for fun and not actually followed a training program, definetely read the books.
    If you are interested in calisthenics competitions, this is probably not the right place to look for information

  8. #8
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Gaetano View Post
    i'm not interested at all in training with barbells
    With that view, it doesn't make a lot of sense to post to this website, but it is kind of funny . . .

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