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Thread: Three-Times-a-Week Bench Press

  1. #1
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    Default Three-Times-a-Week Bench Press

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    Asking for a friend: is there an equivalent of the the three-times-a-week press program for the bench press? Any preferred way of training the bench after early intermediate stage?

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    You could to a HLM Bench Press with the light day being some lighter variant and/or lower volume. Could be an incline or close grip for example. But do you plan to not Press at all?
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    I'm actually more curious about the core tenets of bench press training and how that would translate into programming practices.

    The press is very skill dependent, thus singles across are a mainstay of post-novice programming, as well as pin presses, to overload parts of the movement where the bar tends to drift forward. Is there something similar for the bench press? Some point of convergence among SS coaches regarding bench press programming?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReconquistaBarbell View Post
    I'm actually more curious about the core tenets of bench press training and how that would translate into programming practices.

    The press is very skill dependent, thus singles across are a mainstay of post-novice programming, as well as pin presses, to overload parts of the movement where the bar tends to drift forward. Is there something similar for the bench press? Some point of convergence among SS coaches regarding bench press programming?
    I don't know if I fully understand your question. There are times when you could incorporate heavy singles across on the bench press for an intermediate or advanced lifter. Additionally, there are also situations where you might have them use a rack bench press, which allows for the use of heavier weights at various heights off the chest. It just simply depends on the situation.

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    Let's compare the deadlift and the press in light of the two recent articles by Nick for example:

    The deadlift is a gross motor pattern that uses heavy loads, it requires little practice, a lot of effort and takes a toll on recovery. That translates to programming practices as being prone to variations (rack pulls, haltings, shrugs), and being trained at a relative lower frequency and volume (most of the time at least). As a result most programs from SS call for one set of deadlifts or some variation once a week, usually coupled with a second light pulling day, say power cleans/snatches, snatch-grip deadlifts, etc. As the lifter progresses through intermediate to advanced stage, I imagine the layout may stay the same, only the load/sets/reps selection has to account for the longer SRA cycle.

    The press has a more complex motor pattern and is light, even when trained heavy (for non-Chase-people at least). That translates to programming practices as requiring more specificity, higher relative intensities and higher frequency. As a result, Rip recently recommended the three-times-a-week press program for that guy on the podcast, doing 5's for strength, 1's for practice, the bench press as an assistance exercise and pin presses to overload the movement. If I understand correctly, Chase's program is not that much different from that, and he focusses more on load/sets/reps selection to account for his longer SRA cycle than NASA-like programming.

    These are two examples of best programming practices that derive from a first principle's analysis. My question would be then: has the same thought process been applied to the bench press? Do SS coaches tend to program the bench in a somewhat similar way?

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    What about also doing the press and power clean 3 times a week also but as a 2 a day 6 hours apart from benching 3 a day?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReconquistaBarbell View Post
    Let's compare the deadlift and the press in light of the two recent articles by Nick for example:

    The deadlift is a gross motor pattern that uses heavy loads, it requires little practice, a lot of effort and takes a toll on recovery. That translates to programming practices as being prone to variations (rack pulls, haltings, shrugs), and being trained at a relative lower frequency and volume (most of the time at least). As a result most programs from SS call for one set of deadlifts or some variation once a week, usually coupled with a second light pulling day, say power cleans/snatches, snatch-grip deadlifts, etc. As the lifter progresses through intermediate to advanced stage, I imagine the layout may stay the same, only the load/sets/reps selection has to account for the longer SRA cycle.

    The press has a more complex motor pattern and is light, even when trained heavy (for non-Chase-people at least). That translates to programming practices as requiring more specificity, higher relative intensities and higher frequency. As a result, Rip recently recommended the three-times-a-week press program for that guy on the podcast, doing 5's for strength, 1's for practice, the bench press as an assistance exercise and pin presses to overload the movement. If I understand correctly, Chase's program is not that much different from that, and he focusses more on load/sets/reps selection to account for his longer SRA cycle than NASA-like programming.

    These are two examples of best programming practices that derive from a first principle's analysis. My question would be then: has the same thought process been applied to the bench press? Do SS coaches tend to program the bench in a somewhat similar way?
    Damn this is such a good question. Btw, I'm the guy Rip was talking to on the podcast

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReconquistaBarbell View Post
    Let's compare the deadlift and the press in light of the two recent articles by Nick for example:

    The deadlift is a gross motor pattern that uses heavy loads, it requires little practice, a lot of effort and takes a toll on recovery. That translates to programming practices as being prone to variations (rack pulls, haltings, shrugs), and being trained at a relative lower frequency and volume (most of the time at least). As a result most programs from SS call for one set of deadlifts or some variation once a week, usually coupled with a second light pulling day, say power cleans/snatches, snatch-grip deadlifts, etc. As the lifter progresses through intermediate to advanced stage, I imagine the layout may stay the same, only the load/sets/reps selection has to account for the longer SRA cycle.

    The press has a more complex motor pattern and is light, even when trained heavy (for non-Chase-people at least). That translates to programming practices as requiring more specificity, higher relative intensities and higher frequency. As a result, Rip recently recommended the three-times-a-week press program for that guy on the podcast, doing 5's for strength, 1's for practice, the bench press as an assistance exercise and pin presses to overload the movement. If I understand correctly, Chase's program is not that much different from that, and he focusses more on load/sets/reps selection to account for his longer SRA cycle than NASA-like programming.

    These are two examples of best programming practices that derive from a first principle's analysis. My question would be then: has the same thought process been applied to the bench press? Do SS coaches tend to program the bench in a somewhat similar way?
    Yes, the BP is more similar to the PR than the DL in these respects, so a similar approach can be beneficial.
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