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Thread: Cues on when to have a back off week

  1. #11
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    • starting strength seminar august 2024
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin727 View Post
    Making very small changes. Such as adding 500 calories to a diet, adding a set or removing a set due to not enough vs to much stress.
    Ah.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin727 View Post
    Making very small changes. Such as adding 500 calories to a diet, adding a set or removing a set due to not enough vs to much stress.
    As a word nerd, I am very curious as to where you picked up this use of the term.

  3. #13
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    What is the etymology of this usage?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    What is the etymology of this usage?
    Military rifle marksmanship. Making small changes to your sight to account for wind

  5. #15
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    Is that from The Hobbit?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Donaldson View Post
    As a word nerd, I am very curious as to where you picked up this use of the term.
    There was a old post you made about Kentucky windage and not just changing everything.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffin727 View Post
    There was a old post you made about Kentucky windage and not just changing everything.
    Ah, I see. I should clarify, then. My apologies.

    Broadly speaking, adjustable sights (or scopes) for firearms adjust in two planes. Vertical is referred to as elevation, and horizontal is windage. When you zero, say a rifle, you adjust elevation and windage to adjust the point of impact to the point of aim at a particular distance. For changing conditions (wind blowing, different distances than zero, or even a moving target), you can adjust elevation and windage to get point of aim equalling point of impact.

    Or you can just adjust point of aim on the fly. This is a more field expedient method, and a more realistic one in a time-sensitive situation like combat or hunting. Doing this is referred to as "Kentucky Windage", probably after an early model of firearm, the Kentucky Rifle, where the shooter solely had the option of this technique. So, just speaking of "windage" doesn't get the image across of adjusting an inaccurate point of aim to move the strike of the round on target.

    Please correct me if I misremember, but I think I used the term for self-cueing, didn't I? Like when it FEELS like you're squatting to depth, but your squat is high, so you have to cue yourself to squat too low, instead. In other words, you adjust your point of aim (your feelz) to get the desired point of impact (proper depth).

    For the process of making incremental changes until you get the desired effect, Rip likes to use a chemistry term, titration, because it means exactly that. If you wanted an ordnance-related image for it, I suppose you could think of it like walking artillery rounds onto target, but the metaphor of Kentucky windage wouldn't quite fit. (Really, though, titration is a better metaphor.)

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Donaldson View Post
    Ah, I see. I should clarify, then. My apologies.

    Broadly speaking, adjustable sights (or scopes) for firearms adjust in two planes. Vertical is referred to as elevation, and horizontal is windage. When you zero, say a rifle, you adjust elevation and windage to adjust the point of impact to the point of aim at a particular distance. For changing conditions (wind blowing, different distances than zero, or even a moving target), you can adjust elevation and windage to get point of aim equalling point of impact.

    Or you can just adjust point of aim on the fly. This is a more field expedient method, and a more realistic one in a time-sensitive situation like combat or hunting. Doing this is referred to as "Kentucky Windage", probably after an early model of firearm, the Kentucky Rifle, where the shooter solely had the option of this technique. So, just speaking of "windage" doesn't get the image across of adjusting an inaccurate point of aim to move the strike of the round on target.

    Please correct me if I misremember, but I think I used the term for self-cueing, didn't I? Like when it FEELS like you're squatting to depth, but your squat is high, so you have to cue yourself to squat too low, instead. In other words, you adjust your point of aim (your feelz) to get the desired point of impact (proper depth).

    For the process of making incremental changes until you get the desired effect, Rip likes to use a chemistry term, titration, because it means exactly that. If you wanted an ordnance-related image for it, I suppose you could think of it like walking artillery rounds onto target, but the metaphor of Kentucky windage wouldn't quite fit. (Really, though, titration is a better metaphor.)
    I honestly can't remember what the conversation was about fully. I just know that the word stuck in my head and I was like, I'm in the ball park of what to do in my training, but I'm in a stage where I need to start fine tuning somethings. Example would be how much stress for a homeostasis disruption to happen. The word windage stood out to me in this context because when I do adjustments to my optic I don't just yank it far right or left, I tailor it to my target. In this context the target is lowest amount of stress to cause a disturbance in the body. The windage is the sets and reps and the lifts are my optic. A deadlifts windage will be different then the press.

  9. #19
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    I guess it was in Platoon, when they offered the Lt. a bottle of Kentucky windage.

  10. #20
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    starting strength coach development program
    Windage is a common term used in manufacture of electric motors, specifically rotor design and also to explain what happens inside an oil pan with a crank counterweight spinning at 11ty thousand rpm.

    My family would offer that it also explains me, after a huge plate of eggs and beans.

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