Incremental Increases Incremental Increases

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Thread: Incremental Increases

  1. #1
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    Default Incremental Increases

    "Without an appreciation for the importance of continued, sustainable incremental increases in training loads, there is no appreciation for the most fundamental form of programming."

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  2. #2
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    Nice read as usual But i just got a question, when would an incremental increase be considered to small to stimulate an adaptation? In SS, Rippetoe talks about a stall in linear progression (assuming adequate food, sleep, recovery, etc) signalling the end of novice programming and requiring intermediate programming. However if one was microloading by say 0.5kg or about 1lb for their lifts, would that still be considered novice progression?

    Also as a side note, how many deloads are necessary before indicating the need to progress from novice to intermediate?

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    confuzzl3don3, there is a bunch of discussion on your questions in Rip's Q&A and the S&C area. Try searching under "microloading".

    stef

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    confuz, dude please just break down and buy the damn book. your question here, and many others you've posted, are answered straightforwardly in the book.

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    According to him, he does have the book. He apparently just hasn't read it or has a very low level of reading comprehension.

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    I have the book, both of them. I don't remember reading a number for the limit of deloading but then again i have the worst memory. I'll recheck, but i did what stef said and used search. According to this http://www.startingstrength.com/reso...t=microloading
    Ripp says:
    The simplest iteration of the intermediate squat programming has you making a 5lb. increase every week. Do the math.

    Therefore correct me if i'm wrong, but the math leaves me with increasing at least 1kg per squat workout. 0.5kg increase per workout would be 1.5kg per week which is less than 5lbs. Simple enough.

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    Isn't it great when you are able to answer your own questions through quality reading/research?

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    The article was great and I enjoy and appreciate the clear, direct writing. Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by confuzzl3don3 View Post
    In SS, Rippetoe talks about a stall in linear progression (assuming adequate food, sleep, recovery, etc) signalling the end of novice programming and requiring intermediate programming. However if one was microloading by say 0.5kg or about 1lb for their lifts, would that still be considered novice progression?
    If I remember correctly (it's a big IF), you don't define a novice in terms of loads or increments, but in terms of stimulus and recovery. If the stimulus required to elicit an adaptive response can be absorbed in time for the next session, than the ahtlete is still a novice. Note that the stimulus might be represented by a very small increase in loads, as it happens when microloading the press, for example.

    In other words, as long as you progress from one session to the next, even by a tiny amount, you are still a novice.


    IPB

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    Quote Originally Posted by IlPrincipeBrutto View Post

    In other words, as long as you progress from one session to the next, even by a tiny amount, you are still a novice.

    Indeed, you are correct. In the event someone has progressed through a linear progression properly (meaning they have eaten way more than has been asked of them, slept well, followed the program without substitution or careless weight increases, attained a particular body weight for their body frame, rest enough between sets, and have solid form [something that a coach would require]), then I would not recommend micro-loading the squat.

    Near the end of the linear progression the body is unable to handle any additional work load. If it does, then it will not recover for the next training session. During this end portion for a novice, things get very fucking difficult. I couldn't imagine wanting to elongate the pain that is experienced through these last days of a novice. I could feel my body on a knife's edge, and intermediate programming rescued me from the stressed state.

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