The Olympic-Style Press -  Bill Starr The Olympic-Style Press - Bill Starr - Page 2

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Thread: The Olympic-Style Press - Bill Starr

  1. #11
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    • phoenix arizona seminar date
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    I really enjoyed this article, but I think I would need to see a video (preferably slow-mo) of this style of press to really understand the technique.

    I found Starr's account of how the Bench Press worked its way up to its current status very interesting. I've been around for awhile and never heard this explanation before. Also, his comments on Rotator Cuff problems being essentially a non-issue before the Bench Press became the sine qua non of exercise programs gives one something to think about. I haven't done Bench Presses in 2 years due to shoulder issues (I tried a few times and hosed up my shoulder each time). Although I'd like to try BPs again in the future, after reading this article I don't feel nearly as bad as I used to about not being able to BP. For the past year I've been pressing as explained in SS. One shoulder is now completely pain free and the other is slowly but surely getting better. And to think that a little over a year ago a PT told me it was imperative to avoid overhead presses. Go figure!

    So far the articles and interviews here have been outstanding. I'm really looking forward to that Tommy Suggs interview.

  2. #12
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    Anyone happen to spot a video of this lift being performed correctly? Anywhere on youtube maybe? Real interested on seeing how it is really done.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nJrYPVJ88M
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7erVblY7aiU
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2Ymx...eature=related

    Nice article. I must admit, that I had not previously realized the difference between the Olympic Press and the style of press in SS. He isn't kidding when he says that it is a fast lift.

  3. #13
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    I would very much like to have a higher resolution instruction video demonstrating this type of press; I'd be interested in learning it

  4. #14
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vs8svOg9c9o
    (Doug Hepburn, but from the angle it is hard to see how much layback he uses)

    This website has about 10 videos of various competitors (there's a little pull down menu below the video player - I almost missed it the first time):
    http://www.chidlovski.net/liftup/web...ess_techniques

    As for higher resolution.... since the lift hasn't been contested on an Olympic stage since 1972, I think we mostly only have very old video reels and 8mm films. I'd love it if someone could make a video of anyone who still trains and performs the lift as Bill describes it.

    I also came across this short doc about Alexeev:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewDX4Cx4mTc

  5. #15
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    Here's a whole bunch of old Russian videos, many of which include the Olympic Press. There's even some footage of Tommy Kono competing:


  6. #16
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    Default shoulder issues

    Starr writes:
    In addition, the bench press is frequently overworked and the
    joints involved – shoulders, elbows, and wrists – pay the price. Added to this is the fact that few who are enamored with the bench press seldom do anything significant for their upper backs. Eventually, those muscles supporting the shoulder joints in the front become much stronger than those in the rear, and when that happens the athlete begins to experience pain in the rear portion of the shoulders. If they do not respond sensibly to the early warning signals and continue to pound away on the bench press, the pecs will tighten and shorten and at the same time the muscles that support the rotator cuffs become weaker in a process called “reciprocal inhibition.” In short, if any upper body exercise should be dropped from a routine, it’s the bench press, not the press.

    My question: what sort of exercises does Starr have in mind, for the upper back, to offset this "reciprocal inhibition"? Couldn't the press alone guard against this problem?

  7. #17
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    It has been my experience that it does, and that that presses are sufficient to balance out the shoulder. I have used them to correct chronic shoulder problems for many years.

  8. #18
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    Thanks, Rip.

  9. #19
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    This olympic style press is basically a competition imposed method of getting heavy stuff overhead. The extra help gained by the techniques in this article serve to pop the bar up at the begining. My question is -

    is it that important considering it isnt contested and if someone was looking to see how much they could lift with a extra pop would they not just be better off push pressing?

    I just fail to see the value aside from learning another technique.

    Can somebody enlighten me! preferably with out the use of violence.

    I know that when I tried it it did require coordination and used more muscle than the strict press but surely the push press and jerk are superior?

  10. #20
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    I think the article explains the historical context in which this form was developed. Starr used it to press 350 at 198. Can you push press 350?

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