straight bar deadlift vs trap bar deadlift. straight bar deadlift vs trap bar deadlift. - Page 2

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Thread: straight bar deadlift vs trap bar deadlift.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by blowdpanis View Post
    It's really not that rare to lift two heavy things, one in each arm, or to pick up something between your legs, so I'm not sure I agree with this.
    you raise good points. how about dumbbell shrugs, farmer's walks, kettlebell squats and sumo deadlifts ?

    yes i realize most gyms don't have KB or DB heavy enough, that's why in my commercial gym equipment i said a good gym *ideally* should have KB and DB go up to 200 lbs.

    Quote Originally Posted by blowdpanis View Post
    We don't strength train to mimic real life movements anyways
    no you don't, but you should. unless you plan on competing in PL meets you should train for real life. unfortunately serious coaches like Rip will focus on training for artificial exercises because only competitive athletes need that level of expertise in the first place, and competitive athletes train to win artificial competitions not to be strong in real life.

    if you are under 25 and gaining in strength at a good rate it may be interesting to find out what you are capable of on an artificial lift by training specifically for it. if you're over 30 like me and if you had already peaked a decade ago it no longer makes sense to train for anything other than real life, health or looks.

    i used to train for numbers on Bench and Deadlift when i was in college, but now it's mostly for real life, which is why i'm focusing on kettlebells.
    Last edited by G1981C; 06-06-2014 at 04:10 PM.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by blowdpanis View Post
    The primary difference between a barbell deadlift and trap bar is that the former will have you more bent over with less forward knee travel, so it's going to be slightly more posterior chain dominant, whereas a trap bar is more like a squat, a nice split between posterior/anterior chain.
    Not necessarily. Try this experiment:
    1. Set up for a straight bar deadlift.
    2. Release your grip and have an assistant roll the barbell forward and away. Strictly maintain your setup position: knee angle, hip angle, back angle.
    3. Now rotate your hands from the pronated position to a neutral position
    4. You are now set up for a trap bar deadlift. Except for the neutral grip, everything else is precisely the same as your setup for the straight bar deadlift.
    In a correctly executed straight bar deadlift, the bar follows a plumb vertical path up to lockout and back down to the platform. The same is true for a correctly executed trap bar deadlift: the bar follows a plumb vertical path.

    The point is that using a trap bar, you can set up and execute a deadlift exactly as you would with a straight bar. The only difference is the neutral grip, which for most lifters is an advantage from the standpoint of grip. Granted, with a trap bar you can modify the lift so it is a cross between a squat and deadlift. But nothing about a trap bar necessitates this.

    Another objection that some make is that at the top of the lift, a trap bar is liable to swing link a pendulum, because it isn't braced against the front of your thighs. But if that happens, it is because the lift wasn't properly executed. In a correctly executed deadlift, the bar follows a plumb vertical path from floor to lockout. In a plumb vertical path, there are no horizontal forces to cause the bar to swing. (I would argue that because the trap bar can swing at the lockout position, it requires you to be more attentive to form and balance than with a straight bar deadlift. If you don't get that vertical path right, the bar might sway at lockout.)

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by G1981C View Post
    no you don't, but you should. unless you plan on competing in PL meets you should train for real life. unfortunately serious coaches like Rip will focus on training for artificial exercises because only competitive athletes need that level of expertise in the first place, and competitive athletes train to win artificial competitions not to be strong in real life.

    if you are under 25 and gaining in strength at a good rate it may be interesting to find out what you are capable of on an artificial lift by training specifically for it. if you're over 30 like me and if you had already peaked a decade ago it no longer makes sense to train for anything other than real life, health or looks.
    Can you elaborate more on this “real life strength” ? How does a 200 lb kettlebell give you more “real life strength” than a 200 lb barbell? What the hell is an “artificial lift” ? Styrofoam weights?

    Any way you cut it, the guy with a 500 lb back squat is stronger than the guy with a 185 lb kettlebell goblet squat.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichieRich View Post
    straight bar deadlift vs trap bar deadlift.
    I'd like to know how much extra weight you can personally lift. Pounds and percents would be a desirable answer
    Why do you want this information? Let's say you had a huge amount of data and everyone can trap deadlift 4% more than their deadlift. What are you going to do with that prescriptively?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewLewis View Post
    Why do you want this information? Let's say you had a huge amount of data and everyone can trap deadlift 4% more than their deadlift. What are you going to do with that prescriptively?
    Did you look at the date of the OP? This thread was somehow resurrected from the graveyard of over 5 years ago. I don't think the OP is around anymore, which is probably good, because as I recall, he asked a lot of annoying questions that belied his willful ignorance and didn't learn much from the many gracious responses. Maybe he's really strong and knowledgable now, who knows, but I'm pretty sure he's no longer here.
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Wolf View Post
    Did you look at the date of the OP? This thread was somehow resurrected from the graveyard of over 5 years ago. I don't think the OP is around anymore, which is probably good, because as I recall, he asked a lot of annoying questions that belied his willful ignorance and didn't learn much from the many gracious responses. Maybe he's really strong and knowledgable now, who knows, but I'm pretty sure he's no longer here.
    Yeah. I didn't even notice the timestamp. Last activity of user: 2017.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DKT View Post
    Granted, with a trap bar you can modify the lift so it is a cross between a squat and deadlift. But nothing about a trap bar necessitates this.
    Simulating a standard deadlift with a trapbar isn’t practical at heavy weights. If you get your shoulder blades over the center of gravity, with your arms hanging back towards to you, the trapbar will rotate in the sagittal plane, i.e. the front of the bar will tilt. The bar does not tilt if you set up in a half-squat, with the hands directly below the shoulder blades, and a more vertical back angle.

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