Physical Function and Aging Physical Function and Aging

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Thread: Physical Function and Aging

  1. #1
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    Default Physical Function and Aging

    • phoenix arizona seminar date
    • texas seminar date
    by Mary Boudreau Conover, BSNed

    “Advanced age brings with it an acceleration of the decline in mitochondrial content and function. Damage from that decline can be partially restored over the long term with a consistent strength training program.”

    Article

  2. #2
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    Truth in lending, I haven't yet read "The Barbell Prescription" yet, but since I've turned 40 I've thought a lot about this sort of thing. Rip said in one of the Podcasts (can't remember which one) that after SS, Texas Method would be inappropriate for a lifter over 40 as it is too taxing on the body. But this article would seem to imply that, as long as someone (even one who started lifting later in life) fully worked the extent of linear progression under SS, then maintaining a challenging program could still provide growth / health benefits / etc. I would think a 3-day a week program (such as TM), coupled with solid recovery (not much more than walking on the 'off' days, plenty of sleep, quality food choices, etc) that TM could still be appropriate. Am I wrong in that thinking?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by David.M.Allen View Post
    Truth in lending, I haven't yet read "The Barbell Prescription" yet, but since I've turned 40 I've thought a lot about this sort of thing. Rip said in one of the Podcasts (can't remember which one) that after SS, Texas Method would be inappropriate for a lifter over 40 as it is too taxing on the body. But this article would seem to imply that, as long as someone (even one who started lifting later in life) fully worked the extent of linear progression under SS, then maintaining a challenging program could still provide growth / health benefits / etc. I would think a 3-day a week program (such as TM), coupled with solid recovery (not much more than walking on the 'off' days, plenty of sleep, quality food choices, etc) that TM could still be appropriate. Am I wrong in that thinking?
    "The Barbell Prescription" details a few Texas Method variants that might work better for Masters athletes. I've successfully used the standard TM with guys between 40-45 years old but they had their sleep, diet, and other outside stress locked down. HLM and four-day splits will yield steady progress as well while providing room for more variation than the TM. HLM and split routines will be less grueling, too.

    So yes, you could make the TM work with little to no modifications but it might not be the most prudent option. Grab a copy of "The Barbell Prescription" and see what it has to offer.

  4. #4
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    At my almost advanced age (65) I am doing the warm up from Starting Strength and online forums -- sets of the lift with the bar, then 45%, 65% and 85% of work weight. Is more warm up needed for someone my age? What warm up would be best?

  5. #5
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    Skeg, warmup is determined by need and that is highly variable. Is it working? Is your body prepared for the work sets or not?

    Extra sets down at the lighter end can be helpful for stiff or sore people who need to really get things warm. Or more when the training facility is too cold.

    Tapering reps/set is typically done (5s at the lightest, singles near the work set), but sometimes a little extra technique practise as the weight increases can be useful.

    So how are your warmups going?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeg View Post
    At my almost advanced age (65) I am doing the warm up from Starting Strength and online forums -- sets of the lift with the bar, then 45%, 65% and 85% of work weight. Is more warm up needed for someone my age? What warm up would be best?
    FWIW, I haven't changed my warm up routine too much since my 20's and I'm 68. I still do the old school jumps of 50 lbs. with 45 and 25 lb. plates for presses and squats, and stick to 45 lb. plates for deadlifts for the first two warm up sets moving on to 25 lb. plates above 225 lbs.

    I used to do more reps with the last couple of sets before the work sets but I took the advice offered up in SS to use singles for those sets. Also, I now start every lift with an empty bar. Especially the squat, where I do three sets of empty bar to loosen up my shoulders to get it down off my neck and on to my traps for a low bar squat.

    But as stef says, YMMV.

  7. #7
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    I think my warm ups are working fine. I start with a set or two of squats with no bar, just because I'm stiff. If I'm feeling extra stiff I do some leg swings and arm movements.

    I usually have no problem getting to depth. To help with my failing proprioception, I use a bungee strung between two weighted posts. I do 2 sets of 5 with the bar, 1 set of 5 at 45% of work weight, 1 set of 3 at 65%, and 1 set of 2 at 85%. I do that with all lifts. Before squating I also do the stretching recommended in an SS youtube as, while squating, I still can't fully wrap my hand over the bar and hold it against the heel of the hand without bending my wrist. Little by little that is improving.

    If that's fine, then I'm good. Just curious if I was missing out on promoting enough blood flow to my skeletal muscles.

    65 yrs, 160 lbs, current PR's squat 5R3S 175, Press 5R3S 85, Bench 5R3S 130, Deadlift 5R2S 217, Clean 5R3S 65 (I have had a lot of trouble building good form in the clean).

    Forgive my denseness, what is YMMV?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeg View Post
    I think my warm ups are working fine. I start with a set or two of squats with no bar, just because I'm stiff. If I'm feeling extra stiff I do some leg swings and arm movements.

    I usually have no problem getting to depth. To help with my failing proprioception, I use a bungee strung between two weighted posts. I do 2 sets of 5 with the bar, 1 set of 5 at 45% of work weight, 1 set of 3 at 65%, and 1 set of 2 at 85%. I do that with all lifts. Before squating I also do the stretching recommended in an SS youtube as, while squating, I still can't fully wrap my hand over the bar and hold it against the heel of the hand without bending my wrist. Little by little that is improving.

    If that's fine, then I'm good. Just curious if I was missing out on promoting enough blood flow to my skeletal muscles.

    65 yrs, 160 lbs, current PR's squat 5R3S 175, Press 5R3S 85, Bench 5R3S 130, Deadlift 5R2S 217, Clean 5R3S 65 (I have had a lot of trouble building good form in the clean).

    Forgive my denseness, what is YMMV?
    Heh.

    I did the same trick with a bungee early on doing SS squats to depth.

    Also, YMMV means Your Mileage May Vary.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeg View Post
    I think my warm ups are working fine. I start with a set or two of squats with no bar, just because I'm stiff. If I'm feeling extra stiff I do some leg swings and arm movements.

    I usually have no problem getting to depth. To help with my failing proprioception, I use a bungee strung between two weighted posts. I do 2 sets of 5 with the bar, 1 set of 5 at 45% of work weight, 1 set of 3 at 65%, and 1 set of 2 at 85%. I do that with all lifts. Before squating I also do the stretching recommended in an SS youtube as, while squating, I still can't fully wrap my hand over the bar and hold it against the heel of the hand without bending my wrist. Little by little that is improving.

    If that's fine, then I'm good. Just curious if I was missing out on promoting enough blood flow to my skeletal muscles.

    65 yrs, 160 lbs, current PR's squat 5R3S 175, Press 5R3S 85, Bench 5R3S 130, Deadlift 5R2S 217, Clean 5R3S 65 (I have had a lot of trouble building good form in the clean).

    Forgive my denseness, what is YMMV?
    YMMV is usually interpreted as Your Mileage May Vary, and is an abbreviated disclaimer that the aforegoing may not generalize to your situation.
    With regard to warmups, If I have shorted the warmup relative to what I need I find the second work set significantly easier than the first. I would suggest if this happens to you often you need more warmup sets.

  10. #10
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    Talking to some old folk a few days ago who a residents of a retirement village told me that falls are one of the greatest hazards as folk age, more so as weakness sets in. The remedy to counter act this propensity to fall that was suggested to them was learning how to fall safely. This seems to me rather stupid when the benefits of strength straining can cause a resistance to fall and if a fall does happen the body is better protected.

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