The Grip Problem The Grip Problem

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Thread: The Grip Problem

  1. #1
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    Default The Grip Problem

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    by Jordan Feigenbaum

    The grip in the deadlift is an often overlooked yet crucial piece of the puzzle when it comes to performance and the subsequent gainzZz™ from the lift. In the 2nd installment of The Problem series, we’ll discuss the intricacies of gripping the bar in the deadlift, and what to do about it.

    Article

  2. #2
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    Much appreciated. This answered a lot of questions that have been bugging me for a while, especially with respect to windmilling and the pros/cons of alternate grip.

  3. #3
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    I'm a Geeziod at 58 years of age. What are your thoughts regarding those actual hook wraps? They have two hooks on them that go around the bar and then wrist wraps to attach to your body. I would assume the same negative as straps but is there anything else to be aware of?

  4. #4
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    My uncle uses an alternate grip and reverses the underhanded overhanded side for each set. It did not come naturally but he trained himself to lift this way so as he put it “things would balance out.” Just another item to add to my list that I hope to accomplish before I reach his age of 75.

    Good article...

  5. #5
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    Excellent article, many thanks. Pulls together many elements into a sensible structure and adds some useful anatomical detail.

    Not necessarily related to deadlift grip strength but I would be interesting in learning more about the statement:

    "The two primary “grips” that humans use to interact with their surrounding environment are the precision grip and the power grip. The precision grip refers to fine-tuned gripping and manipulation of objects using primarily the tips of the fingers and the thumb. In contrast, the power grip refers to the gross action – palmar opposition – whereby the four fingers, the thumb, and the palm enclose an object and apply force to it."

    As a (lapsed) rock climber I'm familiar with the grip strength required to haul oneself up using a small handhold which may only permit the use of a couple of fingers or in some cases the tips of the fingers. Would this still fall under "precision grip" despite it not seeming to fit under the 'fine-tuned' description (it usually feeling more akin to a 1RM effort), or is this a different class of grip which does not fall under the 'primary' qualifier above? I believe that this would apply to irregular-grip type strength training as well so hopefully I'm not too far off-piste on the thread.

    Thanks

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Y View Post
    Would [a rock-climbing grip] still fall under "precision grip" despite it not seeming to fit under the 'fine-tuned' description (it usually feeling more akin to a 1RM effort), or is this a different class of grip which does not fall under the 'primary' qualifier above? I believe that this would apply to irregular-grip type strength training as well so hopefully I'm not too far off-piste on the thread.
    I'm an active rock climber, and I don't understand the significance of this question. Presumably crimping on an edge is not one of the primary ways we use our hands to interact with the environment.

    I will say that improving my deadlift made me a better climber, even at a significantly higher bodyweight.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveL View Post
    I'm a Geeziod at 58 years of age. What are your thoughts regarding those actual hook wraps? They have two hooks on them that go around the bar and then wrist wraps to attach to your body. I would assume the same negative as straps but is there anything else to be aware of?
    I think the hook portion has a decent risk of breaking from the strap itself, so I'd just use one piece straps. I use Iron Mind straps and they've lasted about 4 years now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Strega View Post
    My uncle uses an alternate grip and reverses the underhanded overhanded side for each set. It did not come naturally but he trained himself to lift this way so as he put it “things would balance out.” Just another item to add to my list that I hope to accomplish before I reach his age of 75.

    Good article...
    I actually don't think alternating the grip each set is a good idea mainly because I don't think an imbalance really is developed this way. Additionally, I don't think the technique needed for compensating for the supinated side at a heavy weight gets well trained this way. I've seen people do it however, but I just don't think it's necessary.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Y View Post

    As a (lapsed) rock climber I'm familiar with the grip strength required to haul oneself up using a small handhold which may only permit the use of a couple of fingers or in some cases the tips of the fingers. Would this still fall under "precision grip" despite it not seeming to fit under the 'fine-tuned' description (it usually feeling more akin to a 1RM effort), or is this a different class of grip which does not fall under the 'primary' qualifier above? I believe that this would apply to irregular-grip type strength training as well so hopefully I'm not too far off-piste on the thread.

    Thanks
    It's a power grip, as the actions of the hand and relevant muscles are doing the same thing- they just don't have anything to create force against.

  8. #8
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    I tried the hook grip for the first time today. I was just reaching the point where I could barely hold onto the bar anymore with double overhand. It worked well, but I felt like the skin on my thumb could rip off any second - does your skin toughen up and get use to this after a while?

  9. #9
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    It's more that you get more efficient and find the correct position with practise. Don't forget the chalk.

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