Strength Training for People My Age Strength Training for People My Age

starting strength gym
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Strength Training for People My Age

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,443

    Default Strength Training for People My Age

    by Mark Rippetoe

    I was born in 1956. That makes me “old.” Granted, I'm pretty beat up these days. I've had my share of injuries, the result of having lived a rather careless active life outdoors, on horses, motorcycles, bicycles, and the field of competition. People my age who have not spent their years in a chair have an accumulation of aches and pains, most of them earned the hard way. And for us, beat up or not, the best way to stay in the game is to train for strength.

    Read article

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    226

    Default

    Great article.

    I attempted to have a conversation about this with an older relative. A little over 70. I've noticed his slow decline. He is physically active, but pretty weak buy most metrics and only getting more so. Really, I knew the conversation would not go anywhere but I just found myself not able to not say something. Here was his response to adding some weight to his routine.

    "I don't increase the 8 and 20 lb dumb bell weights, but I do try to do them faster, which I suspect is equivalent. My regular exercise is a base which I supplement with chores such as clipping vegetation back from the drive and a wheelchair in and out of the car. Also the occasional case of paper, or 24-bottle packs of water. I also try to eat healthy, with a number of supplements like Vitamin D, Iodine, and probiotics. And I maintain my weight at my college level of 145 pounds; that is perhaps my most challenging discipline. I make sure to get enough sleep. Living healthy is my lifestyle. But age looms regardless."

    I guess I know he is set in his ways and won't change what he has always done. And to his credit, he is active. But minor falls are happening on his thrice weekly 1.3 mile run. His response is to slow down. That just feels so wrong.

    I was hoping the article would address that doing the same non-taxing thing over and over (8 and 20 lb weights) won't preserve muscle mass and bone density. Is there an article here that addresses that specifically? I find the comment here in there but nothing specific.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I was born in 1963, so I'm on the verge of being old. My back hurt and would "go out" regularly throughout my 40's. I did p90x and got a little stronger because I increased the weights on resistance days. Found Rip's work through The Art of Manliness website, and it changed my life. My back has not gone out in years, and I haven't done a sit-up or crunch in that time. When friends my age ask me how I fixed my back (they all have "bad backs" too), I share Rip's books and philosophy and tell them how much better life is when you're stronger. Their response is always the same. "Hmm...Interesting...I think I'll try some yoga." I'm the worst strength evangelist ever.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuckyNedPepper View Post
    I'm the worst strength evangelist ever.
    Based on my experience, that is a bogey at worst. I am halfway convinced that the most important factor is being lucky with your audience.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I'm 62 / 5'8" / 187 in Australia (working in metric, but I've translated here :-)

    After 11 months, I've just run out of linear progression on bench (199 lbs x 3x1), press (132 x 3x1) and dl (316 x 3x1).
    I went to a hard / easy squat a few months ago and I am up to 3 x 1 at 315. I am also messing around
    with 60 kilo power cleans. It has taken a long to time to get myself in shape to rack them!

    Not sure what to do next. I plan to alternate a DE deadlift set with heavy singles once a week;
    I plan to do hard / easy on the other lifts, continuing with heavy singles and back off sets.

    The Programming book has so many options, but not really for old guys. I'm waiting the Prescription
    book to arrive in the mail.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    38,439

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I'm 58, 65", about 180 pounds. I've been doing strength strength training for about 2.5 years. I'm stronger now then I've ever been my entire life (355 squat, 227 BP, 160 Press, and 410 DL in pounds). But until I added stationary biking back into my training I lacked energy, lacked general stability and generally felt achy. For me, only doing strength training was great for strength but something was wrong. Now I feel better and my strength is improving after being stuck for some time. For me I needed something more than just strength training.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Portola Valley, CA
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    I'm 66 (next month!) and have been lifting since I was 61. I had a motorcycle accident last May that broke my fibula, tore my MCL and ripped out my ACL. Recovery was a big reset after the cast came off and LP on squats, DLs, and the other SS lifts. Just went skiing for two days with the Grandkids. No preparation. First time on skis since last year before the accident.

    I kept up with the little hot dogs! Without weight training: NFW!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    2

    Default re bicycling

    Quote Originally Posted by tef View Post
    I'm 58, 65", about 180 pounds. I've been doing strength strength training for about 2.5 years. I'm stronger now then I've ever been my entire life (355 squat, 227 BP, 160 Press, and 410 DL in pounds). But until I added stationary biking back into my training I lacked energy, lacked general stability and generally felt achy. For me, only doing strength training was great for strength but something was wrong. Now I feel better and my strength is improving after being stuck for some time. For me I needed something more than just strength training.

    Try real bicycling - for the same reasons free weights are better than machines - more fun too!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    602

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuckyNedPepper View Post
    I'm the worst strength evangelist ever.
    Most people won't even consider doing something simple, basic, scientific, that requires hard work and discipline. Over the two years I spent at the gym at work, I got two interested in starting strength. That's 2 out of 30 odd people that show up at gym regularly. I share SS articles in my family group regularly and it was only my 56 year old uncle and my brother that opted to get started on Starting Strength.

    But selling SS to women is what I find to be near impossible.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •