How to Give an Effective Video Form Check How to Give an Effective Video Form Check

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Thread: How to Give an Effective Video Form Check

  1. #1
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    Default How to Give an Effective Video Form Check

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    Hey Coaches,

    I'm just wondering how you guys/gals actually, step by step approach the video form checks. I'm sure that they may differ on a case by case basis. E.g. If the form is so egregiously bad, much time might not be taken at all to identify what's going wrong.

    But otherwise, do you pause the video to observe feet position, bar position, etc. (i.e. Setup)? How many times might you rewatch a video throughout your response? How long does a typical response take from beginning to end? Again, this is highly variable I'm quite sure. Im looking to get an idea of how long it takes me to do one vs a Coach, and any tips on how to make my process more effective/efficient.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    You're way overthinking this. Watch the thing in full. If you felt you missed something or that something occurred that needs further scrutiny or was a close call, pause or slomo as much as you need. Keep your comments as brief as you think you can successfully get across the idea - if you've previously worked with the person, a cue might be all that's needed. If not, some larger explanation before a cue may be required, but be concise. Focus on the top few things that are most relevant to the lift as a whole, just as you would when coaching in person.
    YT * IG * FB

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    It depends on the lift and on the trainee. The general process I use is take an unfocused look at the lifter as they set up and do their first rep. Most of the time, something will pop out as a form fault and then I will take a closer look at that. If someone moves well, it is also quite apparent. There are occasions when I need to watch a video a few times to really see what is going wrong, or to confirm another detail. I don't normally pause a video unless I want to really focus on a specific position in a clean or a snatch. The other lifts tend to proceed at stately enough paces that I can see what I need to see without pausing or slowing them down. I would say that, on average, it takes me four or five minutes to write a response. Sometimes less. Sometimes quite a bit more, if I feel like being verbose.

  4. #4
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    I'm not sure what made this post more worthwhile: the information I gained from the responses or the chuckles I got from reading Tom's link. Either way, Wolf, I'm glad I overthought it.

    P.S. Apologies for sending in too many threads too soon. I wasn't aware of the rule. Living in an age of free handouts, I got carried away. (Triggered anyone?)

  5. #5
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    #triggeredAF
    YT * IG * FB

  6. #6
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    Sep 2010
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    Wichita Falls, TX
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    You may be interested in this, Dlk:


  7. #7
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    Oh wow I forgot all about this video. I'll give it a rewatch for sure, thanks Nick.

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