good way to protect good bar from cheap plates? good way to protect good bar from cheap plates?

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Thread: good way to protect good bar from cheap plates?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    15

    Default good way to protect good bar from cheap plates?

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    Back when I had nothing, I got one of those deals at Dick's for a barbell and full set of plates for cheap. Present day, I started reading SS and quickly invested in a squat rack. When I realized my squat was progressing every workout, I got the upgrade kit to a full rack. When I realized I should be doing bench presses as well, I got a bench. Now that I see my bar isn't straight, I'm replacing it with a quality bar: The Ohio Power Bar with a Cerakote finish.

    That was way more money that I wanted to spend and in a very short period of time. I cannot afford to replace my plates at this time. However, the holes in the center of my plates are over-sized. If I press quickly and/or when I set down a deadlift, there is rattle. I don't mind the noise for now, but I would like to prevent this sloppiness from damaging my new bar.

    I didn't buy the bar for the looks and I understand I'll get stronger regardless of how it looks. Still, if there's an easy way that I can protect the bar in the interim, I'd love to hear about it. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Morristown, NJ, USA
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    12,432

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsayers View Post
    Back when I had nothing, I got one of those deals at Dick's for a barbell and full set of plates for cheap. Present day, I started reading SS and quickly invested in a squat rack. When I realized my squat was progressing every workout, I got the upgrade kit to a full rack. When I realized I should be doing bench presses as well, I got a bench. Now that I see my bar isn't straight, I'm replacing it with a quality bar: The Ohio Power Bar with a Cerakote finish.

    That was way more money that I wanted to spend and in a very short period of time. I cannot afford to replace my plates at this time. However, the holes in the center of my plates are over-sized. If I press quickly and/or when I set down a deadlift, there is rattle. I don't mind the noise for now, but I would like to prevent this sloppiness from damaging my new bar.

    I didn't buy the bar for the looks and I understand I'll get stronger regardless of how it looks. Still, if there's an easy way that I can protect the bar in the interim, I'd love to hear about it. Thanks!
    Cerakote really isn't the best coating for metal-on-metal contact in my opinion. Why not get something that will hold up better? Bare steel B&R would be an excellent choice, or any other available coating on the OPB. Do keep in mind that I'm a crusty old curmudgeon who thinks colorful barbells are sort of absurd.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    161

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    It's worth noting that Cerakote is primarily a (tough) corrosion protection (which is why it originated out of the firearms industry). It is incredibly durable for what it is (a polymer based epoxy paint), but it will not resist all abrasions and dings with metal on metal contact (as Adam mentioned).

    The current trend to have colored bars and such, is just that, a fashion trend. For some, it makes them feel OAF ("Operator As F*ck") and for others it is just a way to limit maintenance (i.e. wiping down the bar with an oily rag to prevent rust). Either way, the ends of the bar WILL show wear over time; there's no way around that. If they don't, well then, I'd wager you're probably not using the bar.

    Like firearms, barbells are tools. Tools get used. Used tools show wear. Embrace it. It's a sure indicator that you are not window dressing.

    Whether it's my barbell, or my match rifle, when I lift, or when I compete (with a rifle), those dings, wear marks and chips speak far more about my experience than anything I can verbally say. An unblemished bar, or unblemished rifle convey novice inexperience.

    Relish the wear on the bar. It's badge of persistence and dedication to train. It should not be hidden, but brandished with well earned pride.

    JMTCW...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    15

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    Thanks, guys. I was actually ready to get the B&R before I saw a video singing the praises of Cerakote. But you're right; the wear on the sleeves will just serve as additional testament that it's being used. I wonder why they bother coating the sleeves if they know it won't last?

    So is this something that would occur even if I had plates that fit better?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    504

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsayers View Post
    So is this something that would occur even if I had plates that fit better?
    Probably ^

    Especially dead lifts, and any other pulls from the floor.

    I guess the sleeves might stay pretty (longer) if all you did was squat and press with it . . .
    . . . only the occasional jingle-jangle during forceful reps, and the loading and unloading plates scraping it down.

    I mean the contact point is still a small finite point, no matter a slight difference in plate hole diameter.
    Unless machine fit 0.005" tolerance or something.

    What color bar did you get?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    15

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    All black with the silver lettering.

    My (overhead) presses are pretty forceful as well. Should I be doing those slower? Or does it matter? But yeah, overhead press and deadlifts are the only time the over-sized holes make themselves known. I'm beginning to wonder how important it would be to even replace them eventually. That's literally my only issue with them at this point.

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