Strength and conditioning for elk hunt Strength and conditioning for elk hunt

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Thread: Strength and conditioning for elk hunt

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    3

    Default Strength and conditioning for elk hunt

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    Hi,

    I am a 46 year old early intermediate (I think) with current numbers of:

    Squat-265x5x3
    Deadlift-280x5
    Press-130x5x3
    Bench-220x5x3

    I am looking to add conditioning for an elk hunt this fall in the mountains (and to complete the exercise Rx).

    I want to walk, jog, sprint the hill at my house to accomplish this. Is this a good conditioning choice or do I need to stick with a bike or rower at the gym?

    My belief is that the hill is similar to the prowler in that there is no eccentric.

    Thanks-Jeff

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    44,612

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    What's the elevation of your hunt camp?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Village of Afton, Virginia
    Posts
    787

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Bryngelson View Post

    My belief is that the hill is similar to the prowler in that there is no eccentric.

    Thanks-Jeff
    How do you plan on getting down from the hill?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    297

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    What is the elevation at where you live? I hunt every year at 9500 feet and many time climb up over 11k. I also live at 5200 ft. I do no specific training and have no issues of any kind.

    You biggest problem will be if you live at low altitude. Which would mean try to get to altitude as early as you can, give yourself a few days to get adjusted. Drink lots of water and bring some Advil.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    47

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    I live at ca 1000 feet and hike often. Over 11000 feet I often get headaches so I always take som nsar with me

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    106

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    I would wait until 8 weeks prior to the hunt then hit the cardio hard and try to just maintain strength

    Thereís no way to get acclimated to that elevation difference
    I was told it takes three weeks at altitude for your body to develop more red blood cells to carry oxygen

    Elk hunting is very hard on we flat landers
    But itís worth it

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    RS WY
    Posts
    973

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    Two options:

    1) Be in good physical condition via regular strength training and mild conditioning work (prowler etc), good diet and hydration (easy on the booze if that is your thing), and take it easy at elevated altitude

    2) Run on the treadmill like a banshee with one of those gas mask things on

    Me I'd go with #1 as #2 probably won't do anything and looks really stupid to boot...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    297

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    Can you hunt without whiskey?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    1,262

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    I live at 6,500 feet and elk at at 9,000-11,500 feet. Iím able to get in elk shape with a couple of weekends of scouting for elk prior to the season, however, I used to come out to CO as a non resident from TN, in which case I used to spend some time hiking up and down the biggest and steepest hills I could find with a 50# pack on. I also sometimes used the stairs in a 30 story building. Youíll need to spend some amount of time doing weighted hikes both up and downhill (donít omit this part or youíll suffer dearly). Iíd suggest 2 hikes a week for a few weeks, then up it to 3 a week with a couple of weekend overnight backpacking trips (the most difficult trail you can find in your area) thrown in leading up to the hunting trip. Youíll want to make sure you can handle the back to back days of rucking. Youíll get into Conditioning shape pretty quickly, but you need to be able to ruck for Consecutive days with your ankles able to handle hours of sustained sidehilling (under the weight of a pack) as well as climbing over and under downed trees, which can be particularly cumbersome in areas that have been hit with beetle kill.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    731

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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Spicka View Post
    Can you hunt without whiskey?
    "firearms & alcohol , yea" .... the white trash answer, great


    Quote Originally Posted by poser View Post
    I live at 6,500 feet and elk at at 9,000-11,500 feet. I’m able to get in elk shape with a couple of weekends of scouting for elk prior to the season, however, I used to come out to CO as a non resident from TN, in which case I used to spend some time hiking up and down the biggest and steepest hills I could find with a 50# pack on. I also sometimes used the stairs in a 30 story building. You’ll need to spend some amount of time doing weighted hikes both up and downhill (don’t omit this part or you’ll suffer dearly). I’d suggest 2 hikes a week for a few weeks, then up it to 3 a week with a couple of weekend overnight backpacking trips (the most difficult trail you can find in your area) thrown in leading up to the hunting trip. You’ll want to make sure you can handle the back to back days of rucking. You’ll get into Conditioning shape pretty quickly, but you need to be able to ruck for Consecutive days with your ankles able to handle hours of sustained sidehilling (under the weight of a pack) as well as climbing over and under downed trees, which can be particularly cumbersome in areas that have been hit with beetle kill.
    good post

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