Weak 47 year old weight jumps Weak 47 year old weight jumps

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Thread: Weak 47 year old weight jumps

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    Manchester, England
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    Default Weak 47 year old weight jumps

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    So I started LP on Monday and will be making my 1st weight jumps tomorrow. Initial weights are as follows with press particularly poor. I'm 6ft, weigh 185lb, and haven't used weights for 15 years. For the last month I've been doing the A and B workouts, without increasing weight, in order to practise form. I guess you could call me a skinny runner, and that's what I no longer want to be.

    S 90lb (40kg)

    P 50lb (22.5 kg)

    BP 77lb (35kg)

    D 110lb (50kg)

    From reading SSBBT and looking at the forums I was thinking of jumping 10lb on S and D, 5Lb on BP and 2.2lb (1kg) on press.

    How does this sound and at what point should I reduce the S, D and BP? After 2 weeks?

    Eating an awful lot more will be difficult so I plan to have a 30g protein shake in a pint of whole milk 4 times per day. Those alone should provide 200g protein and an extra 1900 calories.

    Thanks,
    James.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    Vienna, VA
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    I would do 5# jumps on both presses and 10# on squat and deadlift for at least a few weeks, until any lift starts to become a grind. Eventually you will need to drop to 2.5# jumps on the presses and 5# on squat and deadlift, but 10# jumps on DL may be possible longer, until you drop frequency on that lift.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    Uk
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    It really is all in the book.
    10lbs or even 20lb jumps, until you can't, then 5lbs until you can't, then micro weights until you can't.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    Sahuarita, AZ
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    If I were you, I'd do:

    squats: 5kg for 1-2 weeks and then drop it to 2.5 KG (or you can just do 2.5 kg and understand it increases a bit more slowly).
    Deadlifts: 10kg for 3-4 weeks to get it out further ahead of squats, and then drop it to 5kg.
    BP and Press: 2.5kg for both until either I do fail to make all set x reps, or until I'm really sure I'm going to miss the next workout at which point I'd drop to 1-2kg on those.

    All of this would be contingent upon maintaining form that is good enough. You can drive the higher weights on squats and deadlifts longer if you feel capable to do so, or you can end them sooner if your form starts to break down.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Germany
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    Hi James,

    I'm sittin' in the same boat, 47 and weak (well, much stronger then 4 weeks ago).

    My starting weights were:
    SQ: 40Kg
    Bench: 50KG
    Press: 30Kg
    DL: 60Kg

    I progressed 5Kg on SQ, Press and Bench, 10Kg on DL for two weeks, after that I reduced to 2,5Kg on SQ, press and bench, to 5Kg on DL. Switching to phase 2 I implemented power cleans at 40Kg, progressed by 5Kg 'till I hit 60. I have a solid phase 2 atm.
    I had some numbers in my head before switching phases, 60Kg on SQ and bench, 35 on press and 100 on DL, I hit these numbers and reduced progression weights in regards of longer progression during phase 2. I maybe have to reduce the DL to 2,5Kg, but atm it just goes up. I fear that lift, because it's imo pretty heavy for four weeks of lifting again, but it just works. Manowar's Warriors of the World may help, btw...

    I wouldn't start pressing with a 1Kg progression at a starting weight of 22,5Kg, you may not fully cover the initial gains you're capabale of.
    What Adam says is nearly what I did and it worked out pretty good.

    Here's my progression scheme monitored with the SS app, thing are goin' up pretty good:

    IMG_7437.jpg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Manchester, England
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    Thanks all much appreciated iíll Start with 5kg S and D, 2.5kg on presses and see how I progress.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    31

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    The rate of weight jumps depends on mentality and recovery. Recovery depends on many factors including sleep, food, metabolism, hormone levels, genetics, age, etc. The point of the early jumps is to get you strong as fast as possible but the overall philosophy of SS seems to be continued progression (Even at a slow rate), so if it suit's your time frame for getting strong keep the progression vs trying to go heavy quick. As I get older I find my joints/tendons/ligaments seem to take longer to recover than the muscles. In my experience the connective tissues also take a bit longer to get up to speed especially if you are very untrained. This is just my opinion, but I would go as slow as possible because the slower you go now the longer you can train and practice form before it becomes a real grind and the better the habit of following the program will be ingrained... A year from now you will be more successful if you go slow now IMO. It will also give your connective tissues more time to catch up.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    Manchester, England
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikesandcars View Post
    The rate of weight jumps depends on mentality and recovery. Recovery depends on many factors including sleep, food, metabolism, hormone levels, genetics, age, etc. The point of the early jumps is to get you strong as fast as possible but the overall philosophy of SS seems to be continued progression (Even at a slow rate), so if it suit's your time frame for getting strong keep the progression vs trying to go heavy quick. As I get older I find my joints/tendons/ligaments seem to take longer to recover than the muscles. In my experience the connective tissues also take a bit longer to get up to speed especially if you are very untrained. This is just my opinion, but I would go as slow as possible because the slower you go now the longer you can train and practice form before it becomes a real grind and the better the habit of following the program will be ingrained... A year from now you will be more successful if you go slow now IMO. It will also give your connective tissues more time to catch up.
    Thanks.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Manchester, England
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    After 2 weeks:

    S 40-65 KG

    P 22.5-27.5

    B 35-40

    D 50-95

    Weight up 7-8lb.

    On my last squats at 65 I felt my form wasn't A1 and also went light headed after.

    On my last DL's at 95 it took all I had to get 5 reps it was a real struggle, again with a slight dip in form.

    Is now the time to drop both to a 2.5 KG progression?

    Cheers all.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    107

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    Quote Originally Posted by James7 View Post
    After 2 weeks:

    On my last squats at 65 I felt my form wasn't A1 and also went light headed after.

    On my last DL's at 95 it took all I had to get 5 reps it was a real struggle, again with a slight dip in form.

    Is now the time to drop both to a 2.5 KG progression?

    Cheers all.
    I would not slow down your progression until you actually fail, or come much closer than you are now. You already spent a month not progressing at all, which signals to me that you are inclined to be too conservative in your progression. Your perception of what a hard set feels like will change as you get stronger. In other words, you probably are not as close to failing to complete a set as you think you are. (I'm not saying that you need to actually fail a rep, especially on the squat or bench press where bailing on a rep is harder than on DL or press.)

    Let the difficulty of your sets be motivation to eat, rest, and drink your whey protein and creatine. Lengthen your rest periods between sets if--when--you need to. Progress doesn't mean you feel super strong and it is easy, progress means coming in and barely getting 75, coming back and barely getting 85, etc. Form is very important but at the same time, don't obsess about it--it sometimes won't be perfect on the last few reps. If you gut out a rep that isn't perfect, hey, that's still a completed rep.

    I think you can make a couple more 10lb jumps in the squat, and a few more 10lb jumps in the deadlift after that. But I'm just a trainee, not a coach.

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