Functional Training is a Waste of Everybody's Time | Mark Rippetoe Functional Training is a Waste of Everybody's Time | Mark Rippetoe

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Thread: Functional Training is a Waste of Everybody's Time | Mark Rippetoe

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    Default Functional Training is a Waste of Everybody's Time | Mark Rippetoe

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    Mark Rippetoe explains the Two Factor Model of Sports Performance and why functional training is neither training nor practice. Recorded at a Starting Strength Seminar in July 2019.


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    Before I found your material, I worked at a commercial gym for 3 months. It was my first exposure to the gym business and when I noticed that everyone around me was subscribed to this silly nonsense I decided that I wanted no part of it. I remember clearly swearing off ever training someone again if this is what the market demands. I have since learned that this was not driven by the market rather it was trickle down pseudoscience heavily promoted by professional salespeople and professional researchers alike (Is there a difference other than the vocabulary used?). Walking into your gym and seeing an assortment of people lifting with barbells got me back into this business and I'm glad that it did. I'll never forget it.

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    It's silly this stuff is called "functional" training. For my money, a good total body barbell routine IS functional. Get those legs and midsection nice and strong.

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    I've been told that barbell training doesn't make you "functionally strong." I assume they mean there's no carryover to sports or daily activities. (I live in a college town, kinesiology is a main draw here)

    Well shit, last year I carried an awkward 120 lb air conditioner box up 3 flights of stairs by myself, ignoring the "team lift" warning on it. I wasn't able to do that 4 years ago when I was 160 lbs at 5'11".
    At the farmers market that I work at, I grip 2 sandbags in each hand and walk those from the trailer to the tents, and its fucking easy. Everyone else struggles with one in each hand. Again, I wasn't able to do that 4 years ago.
    All I did in that time is get my lifts up, no functional sandbag/air conditioner carries or anything. Just squat, dl, press, bench.

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    We were recently informed by Amazon that "ONE sellable unit exceeding 50.00 pounds must have a warning label (over 50.0 pounds = "Team lift Label" and over 100.00 pounds = “Mechanical Lift label”)"

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    Iím not sure I understand the part about the strength adaptation resulting from functional training. Itís stated that there is no such thing as ďbaseball strongĒ, only general strength.
    But if the muscles involved in the movement patterns for batting and pitching are not involved in the lifts used for general strength training, how are they effected by this general strength?
    I donít see how squatting, deadlifting, pressing and benching would strengthen the muscles involved in spinal rotation, hip internal rotation or shoulder transverse extension, for instance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    We were recently informed by Amazon that "ONE sellable unit exceeding 50.00 pounds must have a warning label (over 50.0 pounds = "Team lift Label" and over 100.00 pounds = “Mechanical Lift label”)"
    Sounds like an OSHA requirement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hreed View Post
    Sounds like an OSHA requirement.
    A likely origin, made in the context of a physically sad population.

    The amusing part of the story is that none of the sellable units (books!) are anywhere close to the limit, even if cases are considered. But warehouse employees had a decimal error, didn't notice that the warnings made no sense, and then referred us for $ penalties.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vigilance View Post
    I don’t see how squatting, deadlifting, pressing and benching would strengthen the muscles involved in spinal rotation, hip internal rotation or shoulder transverse extension, for instance.
    This is indeed a problem that you must solve for yourself, with further study of anatomy and movement mechanics.

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    starting strength nutrition camp
    I donít see how squatting, deadlifting, pressing and benching would strengthen the muscles involved in spinal rotation, hip internal rotation or shoulder transverse extension, for instance.
    So called "full body" training likely neglects to activate the highly specific micro-muscles that have evolved for these particular sport motor patterns in order to perform these highly specialized movements (none of which are seen during normal daily human activity), which is probably why baseball players don't benefit from barbell training or steroid use...

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