Training Kids | Chase Lindley Training Kids | Chase Lindley

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Thread: Training Kids | Chase Lindley

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Texas
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    1,661

    Default Training Kids | Chase Lindley

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    In barbell training, a coach meets people of all different walks of life. The spectrum is broad – young and old, genetically gifted and physically challenged. It’s been my experience that children age 8–15 are some of the most challenging people to coach.

    Read article

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    386

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    “Essentially, you’re molding the kid into a strong, responsible, and critically-thinking individual. This is very important not only to the kid, but to society.”

    Chase young man you get it on many levels.
    Not only strength but you understand the big picture. May more kids grow up into young men like you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    2

    Default Training a 15 year old motor moron

    Hello,

    My brother and I are currently training (at least, attempting to train) a friend that came to us wanting to get bigger and stronger. We're huge advocates of the Starting Strength method and knew right away that it is exactly what he needed. Chase's article pretty much describes our dilemma perfectly, he is fifteen years old, stacks up to about 5'9", and merely weighs 100 pounds. His biggest issue is controlling the lumbar spine, and he is pretty weak in general. The article definitely shed some light on the issue, however, I still have a few questions. We've watched Rip's video about controlling the lumbar spine and Nick Delgadillo's two videos regarding the same issue and have employed these tactics. It seems as though our trainee can consciously control his lumbar most of the time. I am assuming that complete, consistent control of the lumbar is something that just takes time and practice.

    That being said, my brother and I both believe that his lumbar is simply not strong enough to hold itself in rigid extension through the entirety of the movements. Specifically, the squat and deadlift. He can squat the empty bar pretty well with an extended back, but as soon as a little weight is added, he struggles greatly to keep his back flat, and it curves into severe flexion. The same is true for the deadlift, even with the bar resting on the pins in the rack since we've discovered he cannot get into the correct position with the bar on the floor. He can get his back relatively flat prior to the pull (with the help of our tactile and verbal cues), but it completely loosens up as soon as his arms bears the full weight of the bar.

    Our main concern is where do we go from here? We've already spent several sessions with him just trying to get his form right. Chase is right, training kids can be frustrating. Our gym does not have lighter bars, so are there other exercises we could have him do in the meantime, such as the leg press as the article mentions, to put a little meat on his bones and give The Program another go in a few weeks? What about exercises for his low back? What would this short-term program look like? Do we just continue to have him squat/deadlift the empty bar session after session until he gets it right? Any help regarding this issue and what our approach should be is much appreciated. Thanks in advance for taking time to read this post and respond.

    Ryan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    39,472

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    I think he is having trouble paying attention to your coaching. It may be he needs somebody else yelling at him. There is a weight at which he can keep his back flat -- I can find it. If you can't, it may be time for intervention.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    2

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    Rip,

    I think you are right. My brother and I came to a similar conclusion that there was little else we could do at this point since we do not have a lot of experience coaching. Thanks again for your response.

    Ryan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Akron, OH
    Posts
    1,008

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    Nice article Chase. I will start incorporating more tactile cues.

    I have the fortune of coaching a 12 year old girl who shows up every time, listens, and tries her best, but she has a hard time controlling her body. She's gotten better with practice, but on every rep I don't know if I'm going to get perfection or shaking and three axes of asymmetry.

    In your experience, how long does this take to go away in this population? With my adult lifters, they go from bambi walking for the first time to rock solid in about three to five workouts.

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