Artificially Weak Deadlifts, Part 1: Perception vs Reality | Robert Santana Artificially Weak Deadlifts, Part 1: Perception vs Reality | Robert Santana

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Thread: Artificially Weak Deadlifts, Part 1: Perception vs Reality | Robert Santana

  1. #1
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    Default Artificially Weak Deadlifts, Part 1: Perception vs Reality | Robert Santana

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    "The importance of the deadlift cannot be overstated. The deadlift is the most functional barbell exercise we perform because no activity is more common than bending over and picking things up...Most of us have received the memo, but some missed it."

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  2. #2
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    The net result is typically a deadlift that is ~50-100 lb ahead of squat 5RM at the end of the novice progression.
    Hey! My DL is ~85 lbs heavier than my squat and I'm not anywhere near the end of NLP! (I think). Good to know that I'm on track!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    "The importance of the deadlift cannot be overstated. The deadlift is the most functional barbell exercise we perform because no activity is more common than bending over and picking things up...Most of us have received the memo, but some missed it."

    Read article
    Great article. Well stated.

  4. #4
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    This article is me in a nutshell! My squat is 300 and my deadlift is 320! Helpppp 😂

  5. #5
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    First time I ran LP, my deadlift got ahead of my squat. Deadlift stalled, which made things worse. Squat stalled pretty much immediately after that. Iím not sure if this is universal yet, but at least in my case, I definitely feel things move a lot better when the deadlift is at least somewhat ahead of the squat. My understanding is that this canít be sustained for most people once the deadlift gets over 700 pounds, but this is not a problem I ever expect to have.

    I have yet to feel quite the time dilation that Iíve seen described here and elsewhere, but Iím sure itís coming.

  6. #6
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    I think itís interesting that Santa said that the deadlift creates the most aesthetic gain. Though I agree with him, can anyone tell us why and what changes you saw in yourself? I think for me I the most change took place in my upper body. My traps got bigger as well as my back which makes anyone look more muscular.

  7. #7
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    RichardUnderwood, this is actually a really good question. As far as the why, we may be able to tailor the discussion better if we can create some general agreement as to what makes an aesthetic physique. What would be some of the characteristics of an aesthetic physique per your understanding?

  8. #8
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    I donít think Iíll be much help in discussing how someone may look more aesthetic, in that opinions will differ between individuals on what looks best. In short, I think heavy deadlifts simply make you look like you lift heavy things or more powerful. For example, as far as natural athletes go, look at elite Olympic weight lifters or elite powerlifters who train for performance and compare them to your average gym bra looking for aesthetic gain. The gym bra sometimes does achieve the aesthetic goal, full muscles, especially the beach ones, (arms, shoulders, chest, lats). This may look great but may also not look strong which Iíll explain. Now your Olympic and power lifter will look totally different. Barring that they have a body fat percentage that allows you to see the physique they posses, and not necessarily as lean as the gym bra, things are distributed differently. Thereís just a certain thickness that is developed only with heavy pulls from the floor. People who train this way, like us, can see this because we train this way ourselves. We can see the strength and power in other lifters and I think we can appreciate that more. What Iím trying to get at here is you end up looking like the mother fucker you donít want to mess with versus the guy that just wants to get laid.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardUnderwood View Post
    ....
    I don't know about a lot of what you said. Maybe for powerlifters its true, sure.
    Many Olympic weightlifters look like DYEL insurance salesman.
    Ilya doesn't really look like someone I'm afraid of. Madori pretty much has a dad bod.
    Much of this talk is genetics.
    I never max/maxed, but I got my deadlift from 285x5x1 to 405x5x5 and my traps haven't grown at all.


    And its "bro" by the way. Short for brother.
    "brah" is (the correct way) phonetic spelling for "bro".
    Normally, used when talking to another gym bro, with a California surfer type dialect.
    As in: "brah, r u hittin chest 2day or wut mate?"

    THIS is a "gym bra":
    [img] https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....hL._UX679_.jpg [/img]

  10. #10
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    starting strength coach development program
    Like I said, aesthetics would be opinions based. Of course genetics or going to play a factor and we still haven’t discussed why Santana made the deadlift/aesthetic connection. So thanks for your valuable input. Can you contribute rather than looking to argue with someone?

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