Meniscus Root Repair Rehab & Recovery | Emily Socolinsky Meniscus Root Repair Rehab & Recovery | Emily Socolinsky

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Thread: Meniscus Root Repair Rehab & Recovery | Emily Socolinsky

  1. #1
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    Default Meniscus Root Repair Rehab & Recovery | Emily Socolinsky

    • wichita falls texas march seminar date
    • woodmere new york april seminar date
    "I opened my gym shortly after taking up strength training in earnest to help address my back pain, and have been working for the past eight years to help others embrace their true potential and strength. Had I not been training all these years, I would not have had the slightest idea of how to rehab my knee after surgery."

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    Good read - Iím willing to bet that BJJ has one of the highest rates of meniscus injuries in all sports/martial arts. If i were to venture a guess I would say at least half of my teammates have experienced some sort of meniscus problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soule View Post
    Good read - I’m willing to bet that BJJ has one of the highest rates of meniscus injuries in all sports/martial arts. If i were to venture a guess I would say at least half of my teammates have experienced some sort of meniscus problem.
    I'm not sure there is any data, at present, to support this. Perhaps there is some face validity, however, we might have to first consider the point prevalence in asymptomatic meniscal pathology in the normal population. Just musing here, but, I wonder if BJJ doesn't actually produce meniscal tears, but rather, irritates previously asymptomatic meniscal pathology....

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    I can say for certain, Will, that the knees are placed into and oftentimes forced into some really unusual positions in comparison to most other sports or day-to-day activities.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soule View Post
    I can say for certain, Will, that the knees are placed into and oftentimes forced into some really unusual positions in comparison to most other sports or day-to-day activities.
    Ehhhh, I would agree with the positioning being different from most sports and day to day activities, however, the amount of force going being applied to the joint is miniscule in comparison the joint forces involved in running, jumping, changing direction, etc. The meniscus is a dreadfully tough piece of gristle, and it seems to be much more susceptible to high energy mechanisms of injury, as in the Unhappy Triad, or in chronic degenerative degradation.

    Even in weird positions, you still have to apply enough of a force to cause the cartilaginous fibers to undergo catastrophic failure. Long bones are certainly more susceptible to this, however, this is more of a function of leverages applied to the long bones during certain submissions.

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    Iím not disagreeing with you, Will and I lack the understanding and data to provide you with quantifiable evidence that Meniscus injuries are a common occurrence in BJJ, but i can provide some anecdotal evidence.

    No less than 9 of my teammates have undergone surgery to repair meniscus injuries sustained during training in the 6 years that I have been at the academy. I am recounting these individuals from memory and i only know people from evening classes, so that number is likely much higher.

    I donít believe that any of these occurred from a submission. We donít crank on toeholds, heelhooks, kneebars etc. without giving our partner a chance to tap. We donít practice a whole lot of eddie bravo shit or allow white/blue belts to do anything sketchy with ankle/knee subs.

    We do, however, have some very explosive, athletic grapplers: D1 collegiate wrestlers, UFC fighters and top tier black belts. These guys move fast and they move you fast and sometimes your knees get twisted, torqued and popped into some nasty positions with a lot of force.

    Sometimes youíll have heavy dude fall on you when your knee is tucked under you in a bad spot. De La Riva guard canít be safe for your knee when somebody is trying to donkey kick your hook out. Sometimes youíll get a toe stuck in the mats (iíve seen an acl + meniscus tear happen live that way during grip fights). Shooting for a single or double can be pretty rough on that lead knee. Standing up to shuck off a closed guard can get pretty nasty on the knees if they squirm at the right moment.

    The worst is failed attempts to jump guard and they end up on your knee. Makes me cringe just thinking about it. I donít know why heavy people ever try to jump guard...

    Personally, i fucked up my left knee three years ago from falling into a weird position during a scramble. Symptoms align with a meniscus tear, but itís manageable. Bothered me a lot the first few months, but now itís not bad as long as i donít do anything stupid like jogging.

    12 years of ski racing, 4 years of hs football + 1 college, 3 years of college lacrosse and 16 years of weightlifting. Never had a knee problem until BJJ. Still love it though!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soule View Post
    I’m not disagreeing with you, Will and I lack the understanding and data to provide you with quantifiable evidence that Meniscus injuries are a common occurrence in BJJ, but i can provide some anecdotal evidence.

    No less than 9 of my teammates have undergone surgery to repair meniscus injuries sustained during training in the 6 years that I have been at the academy. I am recounting these individuals from memory and i only know people from evening classes, so that number is likely much higher.

    I don’t believe that any of these occurred from a submission. We don’t crank on toeholds, heelhooks, kneebars etc. without giving our partner a chance to tap. We don’t practice a whole lot of eddie bravo shit or allow white/blue belts to do anything sketchy with ankle/knee subs.

    We do, however, have some very explosive, athletic grapplers: D1 collegiate wrestlers, UFC fighters and top tier black belts. These guys move fast and they move you fast and sometimes your knees get twisted, torqued and popped into some nasty positions with a lot of force.

    Sometimes you’ll have heavy dude fall on you when your knee is tucked under you in a bad spot. De La Riva guard can’t be safe for your knee when somebody is trying to donkey kick your hook out. Sometimes you’ll get a toe stuck in the mats (i’ve seen an acl + meniscus tear happen live that way during grip fights). Shooting for a single or double can be pretty rough on that lead knee. Standing up to shuck off a closed guard can get pretty nasty on the knees if they squirm at the right moment.

    The worst is failed attempts to jump guard and they end up on your knee. Makes me cringe just thinking about it. I don’t know why heavy people ever try to jump guard...

    Personally, i fucked up my left knee three years ago from falling into a weird position during a scramble. Symptoms align with a meniscus tear, but it’s manageable. Bothered me a lot the first few months, but now it’s not bad as long as i don’t do anything stupid like jogging.

    12 years of ski racing, 4 years of hs football + 1 college, 3 years of college lacrosse and 16 years of weightlifting. Never had a knee problem until BJJ. Still love it though!
    Ahhhh…...now we are on to something. I apologize man, and forgive my ignorance here. My only real "experience" with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is the bullshit Modern Army Combatives Program. I thought your contention was that submission holds caused these injuries, which, for lots of reasons, I did not agree with.

    Now, however, I am a bit more enlightened, and I will entirely agree with you. The situations your described are classic mechanisms of injury for meniscus and ACL/MCLs. I don't think there is any data to support, but now you have me wondering if the increased frequency of these injuries you have been seeing is related to episode exposure. That is to say, you are more likely to encounter these mechanisms of injury more frequently than in sports like football, basketball, etc. Despite the argument that football players may be subjected to higher energy MOIs, if the frequency of encounters is disproportionately higher, you may not need the same degree of energy for tissue to fail.

    Wow! You have me entirely engrossed in this now.

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    I think that this is yet another reason why fighters need to strength train.

    The condition of my knee improved dramatically a couple years ago during my NLP and itís far more resilient to the stress placed on the knees from training BJJ.

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    This is an interesting thread.

    Other than BJJ, the sport I have associated most with meniscus injury is skiing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yngvi View Post
    This is an interesting thread.

    Other than BJJ, the sport I have associated most with meniscus injury is skiing.
    Absolutely. Skiing is "Vigo, the Scourge of Carpathia" to ACLs and menisci.

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