Artificially Weak Deadlifts, Part 2: The Arms | Robert Santana & Mark Rippetoe Artificially Weak Deadlifts, Part 2: The Arms | Robert Santana & Mark Rippetoe

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Thread: Artificially Weak Deadlifts, Part 2: The Arms | Robert Santana & Mark Rippetoe

  1. #1
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    Default Artificially Weak Deadlifts, Part 2: The Arms | Robert Santana & Mark Rippetoe

    • wichita falls texas march seminar date
    • woodmere new york april seminar date
    "A weak low back is an obvious contributor to artificial deadlift weakness...Properly setting the arms, wrists, and hands into position will contribute to maintaining spinal extension during the initial pull off of the floor."

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  2. #2
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    Thanks a lot for this. I found the part about breathing very interesting. I've always taken the breath while setting my back at the same time. My idea has always been that I would then pause for about a second to get my balance and get the slack out of the bar, then go. This works fine on lighter sets, but when the bar is heavy, I tend to rush and start the pull as soon as I finish the breath. Maybe breathing first, then setting the back, and then pausing will help me slow down and get tight.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2019
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    Thanks for the analysis and guidance.
    If a slipping grip can inhibit the action of the back, is it common that a failure or sticking point anywhere along the lift is due to a grip weakness? For instance difficulty locking out.

    It is interesting to extend this for a mixed grip. For one, the knee can't push through the locked elbow. Probably different issues come up though.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treg View Post
    Thanks a lot for this. I found the part about breathing very interesting. I've always taken the breath while setting my back at the same time. My idea has always been that I would then pause for about a second to get my balance and get the slack out of the bar, then go. This works fine on lighter sets, but when the bar is heavy, I tend to rush and start the pull as soon as I finish the breath. Maybe breathing first, then setting the back, and then pausing will help me slow down and get tight.
    This is the most common error I see with the breath and also why I instruct my advanced novices and intermediates to breathe before bending over. It eliminates the potential for this without you having to think about it and forces you to not fuck around at the bottom.

    Quote Originally Posted by Itay Blank View Post
    Thanks for the analysis and guidance.
    If a slipping grip can inhibit the action of the back, is it common that a failure or sticking point anywhere along the lift is due to a grip weakness? For instance difficulty locking out.

    It is interesting to extend this for a mixed grip. For one, the knee can't push through the locked elbow. Probably different issues come up though.
    Grip weakness can be a limiting factor for some yes. Shouldn't be for a novice though.

    Mixed grip prevents external rotation of the knee on the supine side, which is one (of many) reasons I don't advocate for it. I do notice the errors in the hands on the hand that is in the prone grip though. The need to fully extend the arm is still there.

  5. #5
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    Understood, thanks!

  6. #6
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    starting strength coach development program
    You are welcome. Now go get a stronger deadlift.

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