Skinny man stalling too early part 79586 Skinny man stalling too early part 79586 - Page 2

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Thread: Skinny man stalling too early part 79586

  1. #11
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    • wichita falls texas march seminar date
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    Quote Originally Posted by rquantz View Post
    Strength training 3 days a week is generally a highlight of my day, but if this is ruling your life to the extent that it’s provoking anxiety attacks, I think allowing yourself to Not Do The Program is ok. You will get zero help with that here!
    I serious doubt that the people who told you it was okay to NDTP would also agree that you don't need coaching. The fact is that you're not doing the program, or you would be progressing better. For example, 3-4 minutes between work sets is not enough for any male, as has been discussed many times. The FIRST of the 3 questions. God knows what else you're doing wrong, and that's why you need a coach. If you are incapable of DTFP without a coach, get a coach.

  2. #12
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    Feb 2019
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    You might find that gradually working your way up in calories helps rather than a big jump right away. I would definitely recommend listening to Robert Santana's podcasts and looking through his posts on the nutrition board. Not all calories are created equal and he has a pretty good approach to this particular topic. Echo the comment above though...If this program is leading to major stress or anxiety, then give it a break. I find that training by myself in the quiet of my home setup with no-one else around is the most peaceful time of my day and without it, I feel like crap.

  3. #13
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    Jul 2019
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    Additionally, Nick Delgadillo's new squat video might fix you up.

  4. #14
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    Thanks to everyone who's taking the time to reply to my thread. Trying to address every answer:

    Quote Originally Posted by CommanderFun View Post
    I dunno your personal circumstances, but you should definitely take to eating more. Try to space it out to at least 5 meals (decently large protein shakes can count as meals). It's not gonna be easy. The eating is probably gonna be even harder than the training in a lot of ways.
    That's going to be the next big focus of my training apparently.
    Quote Originally Posted by CommanderFun View Post
    But with anxiety issues, I think a coach is a very, very good idea. They can provide the sort of calming certainty that just working on the routine inside your own head all alone cannot.
    I was really considering getting an online coach from the website, even though having an actual eye on me while lifting would be ten times better, hopefully we can get some more certified coaches around the world in the years to come. No one that I asked has ever even heard of Starting Strength where I train.


    Quote Originally Posted by rquantz View Post
    That said, rather than obsessively eating more and more, Iíd suggest putting that energy into training three days a week instead of two. Again, the point is not to be so unforgiving of yourself that you panic if you miss a session, but if youíre getting stuck at a squat less than your body weight, youíre not doing yourself any favors by lowering your weekly volume. Get to the gym three days a week, eat your protein and have enough of a caloric surplus that you gain weight over time. If you have to take a light day on Wednesday or whatever, do it. Youíre the one whoís training, who knows whatís going on in your life, and who knows what factors you need to balance in addition to your train; itís up to you what you do. And man, if it takes a few months before youíre able to make serious gainzzz I honestly donít see the problem with that.
    I know this post constitutes heresy in the community because it's full of passionate people who live by strength training and look at this as a way of giving up already; but deep down I know that if everything else fails I'd rather do that than quit.
    Also sorry if you got that I was doing (or thinking of doing) two times a week, but I'm training 3x as the program prescribes.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    I serious doubt that the people who told you it was okay to NDTP would also agree that you don't need coaching. The fact is that you're not doing the program, or you would be progressing better. For example, 3-4 minutes between work sets is not enough for any male, as has been discussed many times. The FIRST of the 3 questions. God knows what else you're doing wrong, and that's why you need a coach. If you are incapable of DTFP without a coach, get a coach.
    As already acknowledged in the previous posts, yes, if you can't do it alone, definitely look for a coach. I can tell when I can or cannot pick up something fast, and I definitely understood that lifting is not my natural calling. Only bummer is that my wallet won't be as happy.


    Quote Originally Posted by SkinnyRunt View Post
    I find that training by myself in the quiet of my home setup with no-one else around is the most peaceful time of my day and without it, I feel like crap.
    I wish I could train alone also, I've had my best sessions when the gym was almost empty and my worst when it was crowded.


    Quote Originally Posted by CommanderFun View Post
    Additionally, Nick Delgadillo's new squat video might fix you up.
    Thanks, I will look that up.

  5. #15
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    Oct 2018
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    Hi fellow skinny man. Since it hasn't been asked otherwise, are you exercising in any other way?

    As someone that has a hard time gaining weight and eating enough in general, my best progress came when I backed way off on cycling. As soon as I started that part of my training again my strength progress came to screeching halt.

    You're going to feel a little fluffy compared to what you're used to. It's okay and needed to make progress. Get stronger, than deal with the extra fat if you really need to. As a naturally skinny guy, getting rid of fat easy the easy part. FWIW, it took around 5000-6000 calories a day for me to eat my way out of my first stall. I was about 8 weeks in and 155lbs at 5'10".

    To echo was others have said, if you can afford it, get a coach. Even if for a brief time. No matter how much you think you're doing right, something is screwed up if you're stalling that quickly.

  6. #16
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    Oct 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceast View Post
    Hi fellow skinny man. Since it hasn't been asked otherwise, are you exercising in any other way?

    As someone that has a hard time gaining weight and eating enough in general, my best progress came when I backed way off on cycling. As soon as I started that part of my training again my strength progress came to screeching halt.

    You're going to feel a little fluffy compared to what you're used to. It's okay and needed to make progress. Get stronger, than deal with the extra fat if you really need to. As a naturally skinny guy, getting rid of fat easy the easy part. FWIW, it took around 5000-6000 calories a day for me to eat my way out of my first stall. I was about 8 weeks in and 155lbs at 5'10".

    To echo was others have said, if you can afford it, get a coach. Even if for a brief time. No matter how much you think you're doing right, something is screwed up if you're stalling that quickly.
    No! Gym is my only source of energy expenditure, apart from walking to the train station to go to work and to go back home. I was surprised that even at 3000 calories per day I could get away with so little weight gain but that's the "taller" guy life apparently.

    I'll try a coach for a short period of time to get things right, as other people already suggested in this thread. Thanks.

  7. #17
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    Nov 2017
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    "The eating is probably gonna be even harder than the training in a lot of ways."

    Skinny guy here. Can confirm. For me its harder in every way. But it does work.

    The eating necessary to support any hard athletic activity is going to be a hassle, time to figure out what works for you.

  8. #18
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    Jul 2019
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    starting strength coach development program
    It gets easier once you get a good routine down.

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