Everyday Pain Management For The Athlete Of Aging | Jonathon Sullivan Everyday Pain Management For The Athlete Of Aging | Jonathon Sullivan

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Thread: Everyday Pain Management For The Athlete Of Aging | Jonathon Sullivan

  1. #1
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    Default Everyday Pain Management For The Athlete Of Aging | Jonathon Sullivan

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    "[T]he ubiquity of pain most emphatically does not mandate or even recommend the passive acceptance of pain. Of all the ages of the history of man to have pain, youíre living in the best, because our options for the treatment or even ablation of pain are more diverse and more effective than ever before."

    Read article

  2. #2
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    Great read and timely published. Iíve been nursing a MCL injury for 3 weeks now and definitely starting to feel the depression set in as Iím feeling weak and broken.

  3. #3
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    Good stuff, Doc. But you left out one important factor - hydration.

    I'm 64, 6', 260# and live in the tropics. Even in the winter when is usually in the high 70's, I don't leave home in the mornings without taking 2 - 1.5 litre bottles of drinking water. Whenever I fall behind on my water consumption, my joints will remind me to catch up fairly quickly - such a tweak in my knee climbing stairs or a complaint from a hamstring during yesterday's DL session.

  4. #4
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    I like the idea of having an "in charge" mindset and was particularly interested in the information about the intelligent use of OTC medications to manage pain.

  5. #5
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    Should probably make sure anyone who reads this is aware of the risk of liver damage if they take too much acetaminophen Ė for instance, by combining it with a liquid cold medicine that also contains acetaminophen.

  6. #6
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    Default Great Read

    Quote Originally Posted by Kentuckian View Post
    I like the idea of having an "in charge" mindset and was particularly interested in the information about the intelligent use of OTC medications to manage pain.

    Dealing with aches and pains are part of living the life of a Masters Athlete, but as Dr Sullivan states we are lucky to live at a time when analgesics such as acetaminophen, and non-steroidal analgesics are readily available. I agree with the advice to get on the pain quickly, not allowing it to become an all encompassing problem. Musculoskeletal pain caused by minor sprains, muscle strains does well with wraps, ice and the OTC analgesics. Thanks for the great read.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by poser View Post
    Great read and timely published. I’ve been nursing a MCL injury for 3 weeks now and definitely starting to feel the depression set in as I’m feeling weak and broken.
    Poser, I feel for you. I'm on the far side of an MCL tear and working to build it back up. Be patient and heal, then get back under the bar.

  8. #8
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    I've worked Paul Horns squat stretch successfully, and although its painful for me, I'm happy with my lower back squat performance that past couple years after a 25 year lapse.
    There is a downside. I squat 2x per week, not so light, and not so heavy. A couple days after I squat the tightness and pain still remain in the front and top of my shoulders, biceps and shoulder joints. Is this something I should see my orthopedic about or should I attempt to squat stretch daily or every other day thinking it might help with flexibility and range of motion? At 65 I really don't want to do any further damage. Any thoughts? Anyone out there with similar experience? Thanks in advance.

  9. #9
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    I'd be interested in the arthritic conditions of your shoulders. Do you have osteoarthritis? Might be important to know how hard you can push without poking a hole in something.

  10. #10
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    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by jww8 View Post
    I've worked Paul Horns squat stretch successfully, and although its painful for me, I'm happy with my lower back squat performance that past couple years after a 25 year lapse.
    There is a downside. I squat 2x per week, not so light, and not so heavy. A couple days after I squat the tightness and pain still remain in the front and top of my shoulders, biceps and shoulder joints. Is this something I should see my orthopedic about or should I attempt to squat stretch daily or every other day thinking it might help with flexibility and range of motion? At 65 I really don't want to do any further damage. Any thoughts? Anyone out there with similar experience? Thanks in advance.
    I tried all kinds of stretching and it did help. Some. I finally discovered that the answer for me was to quit using the power racks with hooks and uprights precisely where my hands wanted to be so I could get the bar nestled far enough down my back for a good low bar position. The gym I lift in has lots of power racks and a pair of free standing squat stands that are not bolted to each other. In other words, I can move them in closer to each other and get the hand position and width I need on the bar. I stack some Samson lifting blocks on either side as safety rails.

    It has made squatting much better for me, and cleared up much of the attendant lower back fatigue that haunted me for several days after squats. It may even improve my deadlift 1RM given this improved recovery factor.

    Something to consider if you have or can find or acquire the equipment.

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