Freedom (The Irreducible Human) versus Cleverness | Daniel Oakes Freedom (The Irreducible Human) versus Cleverness | Daniel Oakes

starting strength gym
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Freedom (The Irreducible Human) versus Cleverness | Daniel Oakes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,839

    Default Freedom (The Irreducible Human) versus Cleverness | Daniel Oakes

    • wichita falls texas march seminar date
    • woodmere new york april seminar date
    "We are clever creatures. Too clever. We can build Hadron Colliders, fly to the moon, and perform heart surgery. But when it comes to applying our cleverness to our own Philosophically problematic psyches, everything goes downhill faster than you can say, 'I am envious of my Dad's dick.' Because Freud said so. As if that's the only explanation necessary."

    Read article

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    965

    Default

    If my own experience of life is anything to go by, it really doesn't matter what anyone thinks, only what you think. For several years I've followed the Objectivist philosophy of man as the hero of his own story; production as his noblest virtue; reason as his only absolute; happiness as his highest moral value. No one can tell anyone how to be happy, it's the individuals responsibility to find it if he can.

    I regard strength training as the "productive" part of the objectivists equation and if you came to that conclusion honestly for your own sake, not because what others think, then that completes the rational part of the equation. The 'happiness' part is the bit which tells you that you succeeded in the other two parts, it a by-product of self-esteem, a result of an emotional tally system.

    Trying to find happiness-something common in today-is hedonism. Many try to short circuit the requirements for self-esteem through hedonism, by trying to cheat reality, but it always fails, it's putting the cart before the horse.

    Anyway, I enjoyed the article, it has the feel of an authentic explorer of life.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nockian View Post
    If my own experience of life is anything to go by, it really doesn't matter what anyone thinks, only what you think. For several years I've followed the Objectivist philosophy of man as the hero of his own story; production as his noblest virtue; reason as his only absolute; happiness as his highest moral value. No one can tell anyone how to be happy, it's the individuals responsibility to find it if he can.

    I regard strength training as the "productive" part of the objectivists equation and if you came to that conclusion honestly for your own sake, not because what others think, then that completes the rational part of the equation. The 'happiness' part is the bit which tells you that you succeeded in the other two parts, it a by-product of self-esteem, a result of an emotional tally system.

    Trying to find happiness-something common in today-is hedonism. Many try to short circuit the requirements for self-esteem through hedonism, by trying to cheat reality, but it always fails, it's putting the cart before the horse.

    Anyway, I enjoyed the article, it has the feel of an authentic explorer of life.
    Someone like Ayn Rand's writings...(not that there's anything at all wrong with that)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    965

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MarinePMI View Post
    Someone like Ayn Rand's writings...(not that there's anything at all wrong with that)
    Indeed. In the context of Mr Oakes writing, he appears to have come to the same conclusion about life as Rand did; that the purpose of our lives is to live it for ourselves, not for the sake of other people, nor through the eyes of others. He got a dog because he wanted a dog and he started strength training because he wanted to pursue the value of strength-both for purely rational and selfish reasons.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •