How to Do Conditioning: It Depends | Nick Delgadillo How to Do Conditioning: It Depends | Nick Delgadillo

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Thread: How to Do Conditioning: It Depends | Nick Delgadillo

  1. #1
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    Default How to Do Conditioning: It Depends | Nick Delgadillo

    • wichita falls texas june seminar date
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    "[T]he Principle of Diminishing Returns coupled with the stress, recovery, adaptation cycle, and the need for complexity, individualization, and specific programming at any given time applies to conditioning as well [as strength training]."

    Read article

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    Thanks! Well timed (for me) and a great article. The 3 step novice to pro model outlined in the article makes a lot of sense to me (1:strength/practice, 2:strength/practice/conditioning, 3:strength/practice/conditioning under periodization).

    Is there another depends on top of the one listed? As in it depends what kind of "conditioning" most lines up with your sport?

    The "sport" may focus in one or several areas: high intensity anaerobic (olympic weightlifting) (atp cycle), anaerobic (glycogenic) (100 meter sprints) or highly aerobic (Triathalons). It may be predominately a mixture of 2 as is the case of a sport like soccer or even all 3 in the case of a long BJJ match. The energy systems involved are always all 3, but the percentage of time you spend in each zone should largely dictate your training right?

    It seems the consensus here is that building anaerobic cardio can be done quickly with focused training and/or practicing the sport and that it piggybacks nicely with strength (I agree).

    I would add that based on research by others in the field of endurance sports (those training triathletes, marathon runners, etc) that the adaptations required to efficiently perform endurance events take time to develop and require specialized training that can follow a steady progression conceptually similar to strength training, though the methods are dissimilar.

    I think getting strong will benefit the marathoner but not necessarily the marathoner's time unless they are also doing sufficient aerobic conditioning and keeping their power output to weight ratio in check. I guess the opposite viewpoint would be that aerobic training will benefit the weightlifter (in general) but not necessarily their strength in the competitive lifts (so spend your recovery dollars accordingly and wisely). You can't train one extreme and just hop into another.

    Should a person doing an aerobic intensive sport like marathons alter step 1 to include both (strength and conditioning) where strength is this program and conditioning is longer slower training (aerobic only, could be a mix of activities). Practice in this case would be in-season running / races or running race pace.

    I know this isn't a place to discuss endurance training, but this program seems optimally suited as the strength portion of an endurance athlete's training and later on periodization.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikesandcars View Post
    Thanks! Well timed (for me) and a great article. The 3 step novice to pro model outlined in the article makes a lot of sense to me (1:strength/practice, 2:strength/practice/conditioning, 3:strength/practice/conditioning under periodization).

    Is there another depends on top of the one listed? As in it depends what kind of "conditioning" most lines up with your sport?

    The "sport" may focus in one or several areas: high intensity anaerobic (olympic weightlifting) (atp cycle), anaerobic (glycogenic) (100 meter sprints) or highly aerobic (Triathalons). It may be predominately a mixture of 2 as is the case of a sport like soccer or even all 3 in the case of a long BJJ match. The energy systems involved are always all 3, but the percentage of time you spend in each zone should largely dictate your training right?

    It seems the consensus here is that building anaerobic cardio can be done quickly with focused training and/or practicing the sport and that it piggybacks nicely with strength (I agree).

    I would add that based on research by others in the field of endurance sports (those training triathletes, marathon runners, etc) that the adaptations required to efficiently perform endurance events take time to develop and require specialized training that can follow a steady progression conceptually similar to strength training, though the methods are dissimilar.

    I think getting strong will benefit the marathoner but not necessarily the marathoner's time unless they are also doing sufficient aerobic conditioning and keeping their power output to weight ratio in check. I guess the opposite viewpoint would be that aerobic training will benefit the weightlifter (in general) but not necessarily their strength in the competitive lifts (so spend your recovery dollars accordingly and wisely). You can't train one extreme and just hop into another.

    Should a person doing an aerobic intensive sport like marathons alter step 1 to include both (strength and conditioning) where strength is this program and conditioning is longer slower training (aerobic only, could be a mix of activities). Practice in this case would be in-season running / races or running race pace.

    I know this isn't a place to discuss endurance training, but this program seems optimally suited as the strength portion of an endurance athlete's training and later on periodization.
    Remember that endurance training will limit strength gains, so the situation takes care of itself. Step one is strength training plus practice of the sport and if the sport is endurance based, then the intermediate, novice, advanced progression happens "artificially" sooner than it would in the absence of heavy endurance practice. So, the strength work will slow down very soon in relative terms and the endurance/conditioning work will proceed based on the athlete's needs.

    Does that make more sense?

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    Wise words, coach.

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    Thanks for a great article,
    I don’t have a sport as such, but notice situations in day to day life where I’d like a bit more “wind”- playing with my kids, carrying loads a long way, and other activities I’m too embarrassed to mention here but any guy (or girl) 40+ will know what I mean.
    To be fair I think the NLP does bring a fair bit of conditioning and the strength obviously makes some tasks much easier but in the absence of wanting to be conditioned for sport, what do you suggest? From reading the forums the prowler gets advocated due to it not impacting on strength training.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdcuth View Post
    Thanks for a great article,
    I don’t have a sport as such, but notice situations in day to day life where I’d like a bit more “wind”- playing with my kids, carrying loads a long way, and other activities I’m too embarrassed to mention here but any guy (or girl) 40+ will know what I mean.
    To be fair I think the NLP does bring a fair bit of conditioning and the strength obviously makes some tasks much easier but in the absence of wanting to be conditioned for sport, what do you suggest? From reading the forums the prowler gets advocated due to it not impacting on strength training.
    If your sport is life, and you're no longer a novice lifter, this applies:

    "2. When your strength training has slowed significantly, continue training for strength while practicing your sport and start training intelligently for conditioning."

    The prowler works great, but it sucks. Do it for 30 on/90 off for a 5-7 rounds like I mention in the article to start out. BUT, if you're deadlifting less than 100 lbs more than you squat for a set of 5, getting your deadlift up will work better before adding the prowler.

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    Great article. I spend a lot of time arguing with the elk hunting crowd about the relationship between strength and conditioning and how, when it comes time to hauling an elk out of the mountains in 100-150 lbs increments for multiple trips over multiple days, that they would benefit considerably more from being a strong 200# with a sufficient conditioning base for rucking vs. being cardio junkies and suffering through stress of those kinds of loads.

  8. #8
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    It's been my hunting experience that no one ever out runs an elk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost and Found View Post
    It's been my hunting experience that no one ever out runs an elk.
    Remi warren might disagree with you.

  10. #10
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    starting strength coach development program
    Not that I'm "strong" compared to most of you guys, but I was able to drag a white tail out this year with good stamina and a lot less perceived effort than a couple years ago.

    They would benefit considerably more from being a strong 200# with a sufficient conditioning base for rucking vs. being cardio junkies and suffering through stress of those kinds of loads.
    That's one of the things I find most compelling about Rip's argument... You can't display your aerobic fitness if you aren't strong enough to do the work (or you get hurt trying).

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