Consequence of interrupting LP Consequence of interrupting LP

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Thread: Consequence of interrupting LP

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
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    60

    Default Consequence of interrupting LP

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    Mark has said we only have one chance in life to put on muscle at an almost unnatural rate. Does this mean if training is stopped before completion of LP, we've lost the chance to reach full potential? Or can we break for a few months and then continue LP later on without a hitch? Unfortunately I only managed to do 8 weeks on SS before my gym was closed. They claim they will be open next week, but I personally believe this shutdown could last for up to 3 months. I've got 2 options: 1. Maintain and possibly build some strength with sub-optimal bodyweight exercises and odd implement lifting; or 2. Purchase my own equipment and rent a space to train for 2 months. I live overseas, my visa is only good for 2 more months, and I can't train in my apartment. It would probably cost me about 1000 dollars to make or buy the equipment and up to 200/mo to rent a house where I can store it and train. Money is not the major issue, but it will be a hassle to work with local agents and businesses to set it all up. Plus locals are on a witch hunt for white guys right now because they blame us for spreading the virus. Ultimately it would be safer and more convenient for me to stick to my apartment and the park across the street in the tourist area. However if stopping the program means sacrificing long term potential strength, I'll take the risk to keep training somehow.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    59

    Default

    You are doomed. You will never put another lbs/kg on the bar, ever...

    Just kidding. Just re start your training after this mass hysteria ends and you will be OK. You will not miss anything from your training.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    16

    Default

    I could be misinterpreting Rip's comments, but I always thought that he was saying not to squander the actual LP. Don't waste your time by not doing the actual program, not eating enough, not taking recovery seriously, etc.

    So say that I'm totally wrong, and that Rip did mean you only have one legitimate shot, and secondary runs are going to be serviceable, but suboptimal.

    Out of all of the amazing info we've gotten from Rip and Starting Strength as a whole, one of the best things is Rip saying something along the line of:

    "What are you going to do, not train?"

    I know that's probably not a satisfying answer, and I know you're probably going stir crazy not being able to train, especially with how fun LP is with constant progression. You're wondering how badly this will hurt your long term strength and overall fitness.

    It's not with driving yourself crazy. Maybe you're not going to get to certain goals as quickly as you would have, and maybe you will only ready 90% of your potential now. Who cares? If you do the program, you're still going to be super strong and fit eventually. We should be optimal when we can, but being optimal all the time isn't going to happen for anybody. You're going to have more setbacks, likely just personally instead of a global thing again (hopefully); injuries, major life events, etc. will likely happen, and cause you setbacks. What really sets you apartment from the 99% of people who've trained before is that you came back, and stayed consistent. It's cliche, but this thing is a marathon, not a race.

    Again, when things happen and you have setbacks, you can always ask yourself:

    What are you going to do, not train?

    Wish you the best of luck. Just know that many are in the same boat as you right now, and we are all feeling uneasy and uncertain. My other suggestion to you would be to re-read through the blue book again, watch Starting Strength's YouTube videos on form, etc. I know I can always learn more, and learning about the program will help stoke the fire to keep you wanting to train.

    Stay strong!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    60

    Default

    Ok good I'll just start again once this craziness is over. I guess we get at least 2 chances then!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Just make sure you get back in the gym ASAP, whenever this is over with and you can.

    I'm saying if it's a day or two after that's fine, but your chance of compliance probably is going to go down exponentially if it becomes a week, two weeks, etc. instead of days after training is possible again.

    Remember, those dudes you've talked to who say "I used to really be into lifting" randomly? They aren't out of shape and weak because they missed a couple workouts, it's because they never worked out again after they initially stopped for whatever legitimate reason (injury, illness, major life event, etc.), or excuse, initially.

    We get comfortable not having to push ourselves, push our bodies and mind. We go after that cheap, short term comfort, because we forget how amazing LP and training in general is, because those first few workouts are going to be rough.

    Hopefully some of that makes sense and wasn't too rambling.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    20

    Default

    You get a lot more than 2 chances.

    My kid was born 7 weeks into my LP. I never had more than 4 hours sleep per night for the next 18 month. I didn't train for the first 6 or so, then tried again, failed, went to intermediate, failed, settled for a low volume 4 day split with a 3 week periodization like the advanced lifter I was not. I managed to add 35 lbs to my squat in the next year. Not great but at least I wasn't de-training. When sleep came back, I hopped back on LP. But after a few weeks, a delivery van had the good idea to disregard my right of way and I hit it while on a bicycle at 40kph (25mph). Some blood, some damaged on my left shoulder but no fracture. So I interrupted my LP and rehabed it with light presses. Then I went on vacation for a couple week and started back on LP a third time this last fall, had around two months of uninterrupted linear progress for my squat and DL and didn't miss a rep until I reached 325lbs on the squat and 365lbs on the DL. And that on a still very limited sleep.

    So you can interrupt LP. You won't become an intermediate by sitting on you ass.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    60

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    I'm actually excited to use this break as an opportunity to knock off some fat and work on my calisthenics and stone lifting. I tried a backflip last week and it was half as high as it used to be. Chin ups are currently my worst of the starting strength exercises and I've never been able to execute a proper planche or front lever. I'm interested to see how improving on these weaknesses will affect my barbell training once I get back to it.

    I was just worried there was some kind of physiological phenomenon where your stress response to training is diminished if you stop in the middle of LP, detrain for a few months and then come back to it. I have no reason to believe this other than hearing that I have one chance in my life to do it right. If this were the case I would absolutely do whatever I can to get access to a barbell right now, because I've already wasted enough of my potential by waiting so late in life to actually do a proper strength training program.

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