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  1. #11
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    Dec 2015
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    silver spring, md
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    At $120.00 hes's not keeping much of it. He's probably very busy though. We are $260.00 per hour plus an $88.00 trip fee which is a very medium rate where we are located. As the owner I do spend a lot of my day doing non-billable work. I also have a lot of overhead such as booking, office manager, cell phones, trucks etc. My guys make a very good living. Between $40.00 and $47.00 per hour for the mechanics and $20.00 -$25.00 for helper. They have health benefits and a retirement fund.

    It is a very stable job. 25-30 years ago work was scarce but help was plentiful. Now it's completely the opposite.

  2. #12
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    Jun 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Boggs View Post
    Yes, he's charging you $120, but he's not putting very much of that in his pocket. He has equipment cost, insurance, workman's comp, vehicle purchase and maintenance, etc. To top all that, a lot of his workday are taken up with non-billable work. I'll use myself as an example: I generally make well over a $100 an hour forging, but half of my days is taken up by the things that need to happen outside hammer time.

    But yes, the trades are generally good jobs and have good job security. And thanks to the riots, fires and storms, business is great! If I was going to do it all over, firefighter wold be my choice. A professional firefighter in my area works 7 days a month. I know two that are also running full time businesses on the side.
    I understand what your saying, Iím a mason contractor and do real estate investing as well, hence the plumber reference. But even still, my plumber who I am also really good friends with his son, makes a very good living. I totally agree with the firefighter part though, although the short life expectancy might be a deterrent for some.
    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    He has a degree in political science, which is effectively useless for anything other than attempting to get into law school. He is wholly unqualified to attend medical school, as he does not have any of the pre-requisites, i.e., no science training, no chemistry, biology, undergraduate physiology, or laboratory work. He's looking at 2-3 additional years of school even before he can apply.
    Good point, but I was more referring to a doctorate degree in general rather than a physician. Also thereís grad school options towards say construction management which would provide a very good income, probably higher than most tradesman once youíre proven. But like I said above, Iím a mason and love working with my hands, and i too made the mistake of going to college without a plan.

  3. #13
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    Garage of GainzZz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    I understand what your saying, I’m a mason contractor and do real estate investing as well, hence the plumber reference. But even still, my plumber who I am also really good friends with his son, makes a very good living. I totally agree with the firefighter part though, although the short life expectancy might be a deterrent for some.

    Good point, but I was more referring to a doctorate degree in general rather than a physician. Also there’s grad school options towards say construction management which would provide a very good income, probably higher than most tradesman once you’re proven. But like I said above, I’m a mason and love working with my hands, and i too made the mistake of going to college without a plan.
    An undergraduate poly-sci degree qualifies you for basically liberal arts graduate degrees and a very narrow range at that. Nothing in art, maybe English or history depending on the electives, and again, law school. If you manage to get a PhD, you’re looking at academia for a job, maybe something in government or at a think-tank of some sort. Now you’re getting into political jobs, connections, personal background. Tougher and tougher.

    Construction management requires some kind of technical training either in architecture, engineering, or technology. Again, 2-3 years of additional schooling to be qualified to apply.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    An undergraduate poly-sci degree qualifies you for basically liberal arts graduate degrees and a very narrow range at that. Nothing in art, maybe English or history depending on the electives, and again, law school. If you manage to get a PhD, you’re looking at academia for a job, maybe something in government or at a think-tank of some sort. Now you’re getting into political jobs, connections, personal background. Tougher and tougher.

    Construction management requires some kind of technical training either in architecture, engineering, or technology. Again, 2-3 years of additional schooling to be qualified to apply.
    Construction management masters degree surprisingly doesnít require that. There is one catch-up course some require, but other than that Iíve been accepted into many and only have a BS in business management. But funny enough and relevant to the discussion, I didnít think the cost was worth the benefit. Anyways, just stating that there are many options to take with a bachelors degree that would end up paying more than your average trades job. Depends on what they want, but the option is there.

  5. #15
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    Mar 2011
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    Minneapolis
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    To be honest a construction management masters degree is not worth it. You can get an admin PM job with a high school diploma. Get a few OSHA classes, or other relevant industry CE and you would be managing projects within a year or two depending on how technical the projects were.

    I went from a field apprentice to a job lead to a PM, and can say first hand that you do not need a masters in construction management. If any construction positions need a masters degree, its the accountant on staff who wants to become the CFO or a contract lawyer.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    Construction management masters degree surprisingly doesnít require that. There is one catch-up course some require, but other than that Iíve been accepted into many and only have a BS in business management. But funny enough and relevant to the discussion, I didnít think the cost was worth the benefit. Anyways, just stating that there are many options to take with a bachelors degree that would end up paying more than your average trades job. Depends on what they want, but the option is there.
    Perhaps that is the case at some schools. There are architecture programs that do not require any previous experience in art, drafting, or design, too.

    That being said, I would avoid a construction management program that has no undergraduate engineering requirement.

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