Inguinal Hernia And Strength Training | Jonathon Sullivan Inguinal Hernia And Strength Training | Jonathon Sullivan

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Thread: Inguinal Hernia And Strength Training | Jonathon Sullivan

  1. #1
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    Default Inguinal Hernia And Strength Training | Jonathon Sullivan

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    ​"The major risk factors for inguinal hernia are male sex, increasing age, and family history. The risk of sustaining an inguinal hernia increases consistently over time, from about 0.25% in late adolescence to about 4% at the end of the seventh decade of life. This corresponds to the gradual weakening of the abdominal wall with aging, particularly in untrained individuals."

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  2. #2
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    Aug 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by stef View Post
    ​"The major risk factors for inguinal hernia are male sex, increasing age, and family history. The risk of sustaining an inguinal hernia increases consistently over time, from about 0.25% in late adolescence to about 4% at the end of the seventh decade of life. This corresponds to the gradual weakening of the abdominal wall with aging, particularly in untrained individuals."

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    Thank you for the article. My father (age:59, height:5'10, weight:260lbs) recently got some "Grade 1" tear in the lower abdominal region at the "bottom position" in the squat. He was not wearing a belt, and also was not able to hit depth due to obesity.
    The same day we had a physical examination (doctor declared it to be a lower abdominal strain), and 4-5 days later an ultrasound of the region, that concluded that it was not in fact an inguinal hernia, just a mild to moderate tear of the musculature that had almost healed up. The doctor did not tell us whether it was a muscle belly tear or a myotendinous injury. There was no discoloration, so I guess it might not have been a belly tear.
    It has been around 13 days since, and he is almost normal now, except that he is really scared to squat or basically train with weights.
    My question is, ideally how would the rehab work for such an injury? Should it have been the Starr protocol?
    Furthermore, given that he has not moved much during these two weeks post injury, is the site of tear now going to be weak forever?

    I'm sorry if this is not the best thread to discuss such an injury. Since it is physically the same location, I thought I can try posting it here.

  3. #3
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    I have a real problem with the mesh repair, although antidotal, my repair has given me non stop problems for three years now. I intend on getting my current hernia repaired with the shouldice repair and getting my first one redone in that method as well. After my open mesh repair I could not have my thigh touched at all without a severe burning pain which fucked up my sex life for almost a year, and will have nagging pain at the site of my repair off and on to this day.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnsonville View Post
    I have a real problem with the mesh repair, although antidotal, my repair has given me non stop problems for three years now. I intend on getting my current hernia repaired with the shouldice repair and getting my first one redone in that method as well. After my open mesh repair I could not have my thigh touched at all without a severe burning pain which fucked up my sex life for almost a year, and will have nagging pain at the site of my repair off and on to this day.
    I'm sorry for your trouble.

    As noted in the article, complications with mesh repair are well-described. However, complications are also common with the Shouldice and other approaches. And then there is the issue of operator-dependent outcome. Given what we know in the lit today, I stand by my recommendation of mesh for strength athletes, although outcomes in this population have not been specifically studied.
    Last edited by Jonathon Sullivan; 12-02-2020 at 03:00 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon Sullivan View Post
    As noted in the article, complications with mesh repair are well-described. However, complications are also common with the Shouldice and other approaches. And then there is the issue of operator-dependent outcome. Given what we know in the lit today, I stand by my recommendation of mesh for strength athletes, although outcomes in this population have not been specifically studied.
    Yes I did see that, unfortunately I am a case of user error. From what I have read the shouldice has a higher chance of not rupturing and less pain, but also do know it is a very controlled environment that they perform the majority of shouldice repairs in. Thanks for the article though, it was very informative and I was not trying to be as argumentative as I came across!

  6. #6
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    Dec 2018
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    Excellent article. My mesh repair was done six years ago at age 62. While my surgeon replied to my query about future training weight with ...”50 lbs.”...we otherwise got along well. Returned to very light training after about a month and was back to nearly pre-injury loads in about a year. Some lingering doubts still remained but a double hamstring tear rehab replaced them in my hierarchy of concern......until the total knee replacement...:-)
    Speaking of which, I would love to hear your thoughts on acceptable protocols post TKR. Again, thank you for the in depth explanation.

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