Best practices for falling asleep? Best practices for falling asleep? - Page 3

starting strength gym
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 35

Thread: Best practices for falling asleep?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    • starting strength seminar december 2021
    • starting strength seminar february 2022
    • starting strength seminar april 2022
    1. Focus the mind with a book (or concrete prayer) - draw it into one direction
    2. Blackout - window shades or sleep mask

    Iím usually too lazy to do either, but when I do one, other, or both, I fall asleep quickly.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Thank you for all the thoughtful responses everyone! It is much appreciated

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Posts
    2,465

    Default

    Natural light for Earth is the Sun. Its light is a temperature spectrum at almost 6000k, which peaks yellow but has optical output from UV to IR.

    While itís output doesnít change, the amount of atmosphere between the sun and your eye does. Itís something like a factor of seven (?) times more atmosphere when the sun is on the horizon vs. straight above your head. Because of scattering and absorption, 7x is ďeĒ raised to the 7th power. A factor of 1000x darker.

    Additionally, shorter wavelengths scatter a lot more than longer ones (Rayleighís law), which is why the sky is blue and why sunsets are red. (Convince yourself)

    So whatís the point? The spectrum and amount of sun light changes dramatically over the day. An evolutionary adaptation is plausible if not likely.

    Electronic devices that use LEDs can be very bright and white, like the flashlight feature on a cell phone or monochromatic like on a flat video display. For a dark adapted eye reading email at night in bed, the amount of light can be very very low.

    The question then is, is it the amount of light, or of blue light, the ratio of blue light to yellow light, or just the presence of blue light that disturbs human sleep patterns? (Alternatively, did early man sleep better with a roaring bright fire and stress free, or pitch black and stealthy?)

    I donít think the answer is obvious and claims otherwise should be treated skeptically.

    (This is a PR post)

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    181

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Satch12879 View Post
    Pretty sure this is sarcasm; however, this is how I got through a lot of 2020.
    Not sarcastic at all--sounds like the two of us had a similar approach to 2020

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Posts
    8

    Default

    I suffered with a sleep disorder for the first fifty years of my life, and I've learned a few things:

    1. The brain falls asleep in stages. The visual center will shut off first. Once you close your eyes keep them closed. Make sure your room is completely dark and quiet. Complete sensory deprivation makes it more likely that your brain will switch over to sleep mode.

    2. Light matters in the morning too. Consider making a light box with daylight spectrum bulbs and hooking it to a timer so that it turns on when your alarm clock does. Sit under bright light for the first thirty minutes of the day to help set your circadian rhythm.

    3. If your circadian rhythm gets messed up (Hard to go to sleep and groggy till noon) it is much easier to move it forward than backward. By sleeping a couple of hours later every day and staying up a couple of hours later each night you can get back in sync in a couple of weeks. (it helps to have vacation time for this) If you can't forward reset it may take a few months of very strict morning light, evening dark and quiet, and extremely strict wake up times before you are in sync. Expect to be very groggy for the first two months and chronically sleep deprived as you make do on only 4 or so hours of sleep at times. You will typically get a good nights sleep only when you are exhausted and then struggle to go to sleep the next night. Whatever you do no matter what do not oversleep--even on the weekend.

    Good luck.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Winter Springs, FL
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Charles View Post
    Natural light for Earth is the Sun. Its light is a temperature spectrum at almost 6000k, which peaks yellow but has optical output from UV to IR.

    While it’s output doesn’t change, the amount of atmosphere between the sun and your eye does. It’s something like a factor of seven (?) times more atmosphere when the sun is on the horizon vs. straight above your head. Because of scattering and absorption, 7x is “e” raised to the 7th power. A factor of 1000x darker.

    Additionally, shorter wavelengths scatter a lot more than longer ones (Rayleigh’s law), which is why the sky is blue and why sunsets are red. (Convince yourself)

    So what’s the point? The spectrum and amount of sun light changes dramatically over the day. An evolutionary adaptation is plausible if not likely.

    Electronic devices that use LEDs can be very bright and white, like the flashlight feature on a cell phone or monochromatic like on a flat video display. For a dark adapted eye reading email at night in bed, the amount of light can be very very low.

    The question then is, is it the amount of light, or of blue light, the ratio of blue light to yellow light, or just the presence of blue light that disturbs human sleep patterns? (Alternatively, did early man sleep better with a roaring bright fire and stress free, or pitch black and stealthy?)

    I don’t think the answer is obvious and claims otherwise should be treated skeptically.

    (This is a PR post)
    Since this is a PR post, I hope I'm not interfering with your PR! Electronic devices are held very close to your face and since light is a distance-squared problem, way more light is hitting your eyes than one might realized. a 10 lumen screen 1 foot away will hit your eyes with as many lumens as a 640 lumen light bulb 8 feet away. My original question was rhetorical. Although we don't *know* whether its the amount of light, blue light, or the ratio of blue light to yellow light, we do know that (in general) a simpler biological system will win out over a more complicated once. Since there would be no evolutionary advantage of the more biologically complex adaptation, one should assume the simpler adaptation in the absence of evidence to the contrary (which hasn't emerged but that doesn't mean that it won't at some point). There is an appeal of something as simple as changing the light ratios on your phone as a means to improve health. I'm as skeptical of those claims as I am of any other health and fitness fad.

    I would not have replied to your post just for this. I tried CBD last night after an hour of not falling asleep and it was like a miracle drug. As far as I know, legal here and Florida and in Texas. I don't think that's been suggested yet in this thread. And seems to lack the next-day impairment of other chemical mechanisms.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Posts
    2,465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EdTice View Post
    Since this is a PR post, I hope I'm not interfering with your PR! Electronic devices are held very close to your face and since light is a distance-squared problem, way more light is hitting your eyes than one might realized. a 10 lumen screen 1 foot away will hit your eyes with as many lumens as a 640 lumen light bulb 8 feet away.
    PR for me is word quantity, not quality!

    Iím still thinking about all this.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EdTice View Post
    I tried CBD last night after an hour of not falling asleep and it was like a miracle drug. As far as I know, legal here and Florida and in Texas. I don't think that's been suggested yet in this thread. And seems to lack the next-day impairment of other chemical mechanisms.
    CBD oil knocks me out like a sledge hammer to the head, but only on the first night. It has zero effect on the second and on. I am one of two people I know who stay up all night from THC, plus a chronic insomniac, so my experience is probably not normal. But donít be surprised if CBD does not keep working the miracle.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Posts
    2,465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jovan Dragisic View Post
    CBD oil knocks me out like a sledge hammer to the head, but only on the first night. It has zero effect on the second and on. I am one of two people I know who stay up all night from THC, plus a chronic insomniac, so my experience is probably not normal. But donít be surprised if CBD does not keep working the miracle.
    Literally the first night as in once and only once in a lifetime?

    Because one night, skip two or three, might not be a bad strategy.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Winter Springs, FL
    Posts
    34

    Default

    starting strength coach development program
    Quote Originally Posted by Jovan Dragisic View Post
    CBD oil knocks me out like a sledge hammer to the head, but only on the first night. It has zero effect on the second and on.
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Charles View Post
    Literally the first night as in once and only once in a lifetime?

    Because one night, skip two or three, might not be a bad strategy.
    My experience is similar to Jovan. The first night was like a miracle drug. The second and third it did nothing. Even one extra night of good sleep per week would be miraculous for me. So maybe I'll pick a day and try to use CBD consistently on that day and only on that day.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •