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Thread: Lower back pain during squat and deadlift (2nd post)

  1. #11
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    If your back is still bothering you, use the belt on all of the sets. If not, just the last warm up and work-set(s).

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    Low back position on squat - YouTube

    The lower weights look terrible, it's difficult to get the movement right when the weight feels really light on my back.On the second 100kg set, I tried out being a bit more upright and it felt much better on my back, but of course that makes my knees go forward too much, so I only tried it out on that set. I had pain doing 140kg and 150kg, about the same as the 160kg set last workout.

    140kg deadlift - YouTube

    I also did deadlift which still caused pain. I have issues on the concentric, from the floor up until the barbell reaches my knees.

    Something I've noticed is after my sessions I have some tightness and very mild pain deep in my glutes and the sides of my hips which radiates a bit down my legs. It's not intense at all, even on the days that my back hurts a lot, so I don't know to what extent that info might be useful.

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    This is pointless, Ray.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elture View Post
    Something I've noticed is after my sessions I have some tightness and very mild pain deep in my glutes and the sides of my hips which radiates a bit down my legs. It's not intense at all, even on the days that my back hurts a lot, so I don't know to what extent that info might be useful.
    Elture, you'll need to practice correct technique at lighter weights with perfect form and run your LP back up. When rehabbing a back tweak, you'll need to toe the line of applying useful stress versus too much stress.

    On your way back up, take gaining weight seriously. Imagine a cross-sectional image of your torso. The more muscle and tissue you have surrounding the circumference of your spine, the better - and the more difficult it becomes to overextend.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    This is pointless, Ray.
    Hopefully it's useful to someone that was overextending their spine and didn't realize it. But this is definitely turning into a one-on-one consult versus a general issue that many others can benefit from.

    Elture- Email me if you want a referral to an Online Coach. Otherwise read/watch the back rehab content, reset your LP, make sure your form is perfect (rewatch the videos and compare to your own), and gain some weight.

    Email: my first name @startingstrengthgyms.com
    Last edited by Ray Gillenwater; 07-27-2021 at 02:28 AM.

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    For the purpose of other readers, does the back overextension have something to do with the relatively high elbow position? I used to carry the elbows fairly high and squat without a belt and I remember having the kind of lower back pain Elture describes, just not as debilitating. Since I have narrowed my grip and started carrying the elbows lower and wearing a belt, there is zero back pain.

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    You're right Ray, this is becoming more about personal coaching than general help. When I fix my overextension, I'll make sure to reply to this thread again with what cues helped me, in case some people in the future run into the same problem. I'll also email you if I decide to get an Online Coach.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovan Dragisic View Post
    For the purpose of other readers, does the back overextension have something to do with the relatively high elbow position? I used to carry the elbows fairly high and squat without a belt and I remember having the kind of lower back pain Elture describes, just not as debilitating. Since I have narrowed my grip and started carrying the elbows lower and wearing a belt, there is zero back pain.
    They might be related, but one does not cause the other. Extremely flexible people can be in lumbar overextension with correctly-placed elbows.

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    I'm also rehabbing a back tweak, and tempo pause squats are proving useful. You don't feel as bad about the light weight, you can slowly gain confidence in the movement pattern, and laziness naturally shortens your reps into normal squats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jovan Dragisic View Post
    For the purpose of other readers, does the back overextension have something to do with the relatively high elbow position? I used to carry the elbows fairly high and squat without a belt and I remember having the kind of lower back pain Elture describes, just not as debilitating. Since I have narrowed my grip and started carrying the elbows lower and wearing a belt, there is zero back pain.
    Here's some context that might be relevant: Lifters with high elbows commonly have a rounded upper back, a loose grip, and a spine that shifts under load, which can cause back pain. An extended upper back with a narrow grip to reinforce "chest up" solves these problems and several others, including bar placement, elbow pain, bar movement, etc.

    Specific to Elture's situation: "Chest up" can contribute to an overextended lumbar spine in skinny men and many women. This is why it's important to "eat your belt with your abs" after setting up with the proper grip to ensure your spine is in normal anatomical position.

    A rigid spine in normal anatomical position is a safe and efficient transmitter of force.

    Quote Originally Posted by Elture View Post
    When I fix my overextension, I'll make sure to reply to this thread again with what cues helped me, in case some people in the future run into the same problem.
    Looking forward to seeing you at 100kg+ bodyweight with a big squat and a back that doesn't hurt.

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    I reread the squat chapter of Starting Strength yesterday and understood my problem is that my pelvis tilts anteriorly during the squat even if I brace as hard as I can and use cues like "eat the belt with your abs". Today I tried out being conscious of my pelvis and tilting it slightly posteriorly during the squat, while also bracing just as hard. The squats felt absolutely perfect, when I walked in the gym my back was still hurting, but during my squats I didn't even feel any tightness or discomfort in my back. I tried out the same thing on deadlifts and it also worked great, I only felt a very slight discomfort as opposed to the pain from before. Would like to know your thoughts on this.

    150kg 5 reps squat @ 87kg bw - YouTube

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