Heart disease and type II dibities Heart disease and type II dibities

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Thread: Heart disease and type II dibities

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
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    Default Heart disease and type II dibities

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    A long time question that is sticked in my head, but I didn't manage to ask: What are the chances that a guy who was skiny, went all the way up, lets assume, +270 pounds of BW and still keeping lift weights, are to get all this shit mantioned in the tittle of this disccusion?
    I mean, is there any chance that someone who lifts real heavy weights gonna get those diseases?

  2. #2
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    Probably not.

  3. #3
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    May 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rippetoe View Post
    Probably not.
    I can tell you that my pressure has gone up quite a bit since I gained almost 50 kg of BW. the generalist med says itīs just a little high, but when I was skinny I had a much lower press than this. Apparently I also have to go to the cardiologist to do an exercise test, since it's been sport years and I never did any. I'm not saying that the weight gain raised my blood pressure, I'm just commenting on something I'm going through that I don't have a conclusion about yet.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeevOl View Post
    ... is there any chance that someone who lifts real heavy weights gonna get those diseases?
    Any chance, yes there is always a chance, but it's much smaller because of the training.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    This subject has probably been discussed on this forum several times, but there are quite a few studies out there on muscle vs. all-cause mortality.

    Here are a couple of examples on the broad subject: Associations of Muscle Mass and Strength with All-Cause Mortality among US Older Adults - PubMed & Muscle mass index as a predictor of longevity in older adults - PubMed.

    Is it healthy to gain 20lbs to add 20lbs to your Squat? Probably not.

    Gain 20 to add 100? Studies above seem to indicate something like that might be associated with lower mortality, on average.

    Would be fun though, do it while you can.

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